Jump to content


Photo

changes in the DOPs role with faster 'digistocks'


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Keith Mottram

Keith Mottram
  • Sustaining Members
  • 824 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 April 2009 - 01:31 PM

daft topic title I know, but it looks like soon we'll be seeing acceptable noise in 3200 asa (and above) when shooting with the next gen of digital cameras. the question is how this will change the DOP's role?
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 07 April 2009 - 02:15 PM

I don't think it will change the role. DPs aren't hired to create an exposure (which a higher ASA would do on it's own). They're hired to create a mood with lighting, and that's what they'll do at 3200asa, 6400 asa, 12 asa, what have you. A faster asa would simply allow filming in newer situations (e.g. totally at night in a city at a decent stop w/o rigging anything--if appropriate).
  • 0

#3 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11934 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 April 2009 - 04:19 PM

Actually, even at the cripplingly low end at which I've done this sort of thing, more speed does not "easier" make.

More speed makes things brighter. When things are brighter you can see everything, including things you might not want to see, such the unpleasant white walls or other unsuitable or ugly backdrops. It's much easier, even - or even especially - with limited gear to set the camera up for insensitivity, shine a very bright light at what you want to see, and let all else fade gracefully off into the shadows.

I think things already have changed, though. Back in the day - I'm thinking of the early days of colour film here - you needed an absolutely fantastic amount of light to get any sort of image, and the DP's job was to blast it with light while simultaneously not having it look like total arse. Even with the most exquisite skill, you still end up with fairly hard light and twenty-six shadows per person.

Now we can shoot in somewhat more normal light levels things have changed, but I'm not sure that even faster actually changes it any further. Real night exteriors, maybe.

P
  • 0

#4 Keith Mottram

Keith Mottram
  • Sustaining Members
  • 824 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 April 2009 - 07:49 PM

i guess what i'm thinking is that with sophisticated colour correction systems and the ability to not need additional lighting outside practicals (in situation where you dont need to 'fake' the light) will we not see a shift in the way things will be shot. if you do not need suplimentary lighting to achieve what the eye can see on a dark night will that not make a difference to how you shoot in a dingy corridor or a dark pub? obviously there is a need for higher dynamic range to achieve this aswell. you could argue that it will mean more time in post to gain some of these benefits but this is surely a more controllable and practical way for some productions to work.
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11934 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 April 2009 - 09:15 PM

Well sure, but then you don't necessarily want it to look like what the human eye sees on a dark night.

P
  • 0

#6 Bruce Greene

Bruce Greene
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 489 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 April 2009 - 09:34 PM

daft topic title I know, but it looks like soon we'll be seeing acceptable noise in 3200 asa (and above) when shooting with the next gen of digital cameras. the question is how this will change the DOP's role?


I don't see the role of the DP changing at all.

While we can shoot available light today if we want by just using bright enough practical lamps, it doesn't usually work very well for drawing the viewer's eye to the actors and the story.

What is exciting is that we'll be able to use ever smaller lamps that are easier to hide and rig and that will have some effect on the style of lighting when these cameras are used.

In the meantime, cameras like the REDone seem to need even more light than film so I don't think we're there quite yet...
  • 0

#7 Ralph Keyser

Ralph Keyser
  • Sustaining Members
  • 120 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 08 April 2009 - 12:03 PM

What is exciting is that we'll be able to use ever smaller lamps that are easier to hide and rig and that will have some effect on the style of lighting when these cameras are used.


And there's that work on wireless power transmission. Imagine if you had lights that you could just place without having to deal with cables?
So, although the high ISO ratings offer some additional flexibility, it doesn't impact the basic role of the DP. After all, film went from ratings of 25 (and less) to 500. The tools change, but the role is the same.
  • 0

#8 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 08 April 2009 - 01:39 PM

I recall seeing a brilliant spoof a while back (think something along the lines of digital food) for "wireless power cords".

Don't have a link, but it was pretty funny nonetheless. Too bad this topic wasn't written on April 1st ;-)
  • 0


Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Visual Products

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Tai Audio

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineTape

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Technodolly

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets