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#1 Jim Nelson

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 05:30 PM

hi,

-What is the difference between a wide shot, a full shot and a long shot?

On some websites, it says that they are the same, and on others in says that they are different. So I'm kind of confused.

-Also can someone please tell me why you light the wide shot first and then the medium and then the close up? Why do you go in that order?


Thanks a million
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 06:01 PM

It's variable in terms of your understanding.
A wide shot, for me, means you see most of the whole space.
A long shot would be farther away from the space (whatever that is) or could mean a long-duration shot (run time) depending on context.
A full shot would be like a full body shot of a person, or object (showing all of the person or object).

In terms of lighting. You generally light the wide first because you need more light and then take light away. Also it is often the most difficult/time consuming to light. From there you can move lights in etc etc.
sometimes though you have to work in reverse, but in general, you start wide because it'll take the most time to set up and use the largest heads and also set the "tone" of the space and then you move in and you can cheat/tweak things.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 06:06 PM

How long is a piece of string? There are no hard boundaries between a wide, medium, and close-up. For shooting people, you could just say that a wide shot is head-to-toe, a medium shot is about thigh to waist up, and a close-up begins at a chest-up size. But that's just my general description in a shot list, on the day of shooting, you can adjust your size to whatever works.

You light the wide shot first for a number of reasons -- since it is hardest to hide lights in a wide shot, where you end up placing them may determine the look of the room and where the sources are and what direction you are lighting from.

If you started with the close-ups, you may out a big soft key light in a great spot for the face, only to discover in a wider shot, there is no way you can get a soft source from that direction.

Plus it's generally easier to march in closer with equipment on successive set-ups than to broom it back out of the way for a wider shot.

Plus if you light your wide shot well-enough, there may be very little relighting for close-ups, which will not only save some time but ensure that the lighting matches in all the sizes.

It's just like the reason you shoot a master shot to determine all the physical action for the actors in a scene, it also helps determine the placement of sources and keys in the scene and how the room should look.
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Visual Products

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Cinelicious

NIBL

Pro 8mm

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks