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My film has arrived


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#1 Steven Boldt

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 11:57 AM

Hi,
I just got my film back from alphacine and as a first timer_I'm hooked! I shot 4 rolls, 2 Ektachrome 64 and 2 of Tri X. I tried to write some
charts as I experimented with external filters on my Nizo 3048. I fired up the Sankyo 2000 to take a look and everything is O.K.(sort of) at this point.I have some very basic questions;

1) I tried using a dark orange cokin filter and got the look I wanted but some of the other film I shot at dusk(not really that dark) was under-exposed. In this case Should I reduce the Number of the f-stop, say it reads 2.8, and set it to 2? I'm assuming a lower number
means a wider apeture=more light allowed in.

2) My focus was all over the place at times. Should the outermost focus ring be adjusted last? My eyes aren't what they used to be.

3)Everything I shot indoors under artificial light is very under-exposed and grainy. Do I just need to use strong lights?

I tried to take notes and stay organized but this is my first time so you know how that goes. I'm still trying to get my head around f-stops,exposure,appeture at this time. I might use a meter down the road but not right now. Ive read the camera manual several times
but it is a bit confusing in places.

Thanks,
Steve
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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 05:54 PM

Hi Steve,
I'll try to answer some of your questions:

1. If your camera's meter was indicating an exposure abouve the red zone (the 'not enough light' zone) then the problem with those shots was probably that the light meter inside the camera was taking a reading with the sky in shot. When using a camera on auto (which is not a bad thing to do) you have to be mindful of what there is in the frame (what the camera is looking at) that might bias the meter excessively one way or the other. Remember, the camera's internal meter assumes the world is a uniform grey.

2. You need to focus the eyepiece diopter. This is the most important control on a super 8 camera. Read this: http://nanolab.com.au/focusing.htm

3. Yes, not enough light. You need a reasonable amount of light indoors with slow film. Underexposed reversal film is always grainy looking.

good luck with it,
richard
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#3 Steven Boldt

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 03:35 PM

Thanks Richard. Good article.
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#4 Joel Whybrow

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 08:07 PM

1) I tried using a dark orange cokin filter and got the look I wanted but some of the other film I shot at dusk(not really that dark) was under-exposed. In this case Should I reduce the Number of the f-stop, say it reads 2.8, and set it to 2? I'm assuming a lower number
means a wider apeture=more light allowed in.


I'm fairly green to all this but just a thought, wouldn't the filter be blocking some of the light into the iris? As in the meter reads the light unfiltered?

-Joel
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#5 Steven Boldt

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 04:06 PM

I need to get a better handle on the basics of cameras but filters are a gas. I kept the camera on it's artificial light setting to keep the internal filter off. I assume that's how this works but I could be wrong. Using external filters with super 8 is tricky but I'll do my best to figure it out. Different cameras could require different methods.

Edited by Steven Boldt, 19 April 2009 - 04:08 PM.

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#6 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 06:29 PM

I need to get a better handle on the basics of cameras but filters are a gas. I kept the camera on it's artificial light setting to keep the internal filter off. I assume that's how this works but I could be wrong. Using external filters with super 8 is tricky but I'll do my best to figure it out. Different cameras could require different methods.


The majority of super 8 cameras have TTL (through the lens) light meters. With TTL meters, anything you put on the lens is effectively already taken in to account when the meter sets an exposure. You don't need to adjust for it separately. There are a few super 8 cameras that have external light meter sensors (non-TTL). If its one of these, you would have to factor the filter in to the exposure. But it probably isn't one of these.
Yes, having the camera set to 'tungsten' (or 'bulb') means you have switched the internal filter out of position.

cheers,
richard
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#7 Steven Boldt

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 10:20 PM

That's what I assumed. Im using "The Photographer's Guide to Filters" by Lee Frost. It's a great book for beginners and I'm looking forward to trying reds and greens next. Wish I had more funds right now. :(
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