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Somebody please tell me how do I convert this?


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#1 Jake Windhurst

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 08:18 PM

I Capture my DV cameras footage onto the pc with Ulead onto an MPeg, how do I convert it to an xvid, and the kind of nice files with, high quality, low size, the kiddies are all watching today?
I used an xvid conversion software but the kind of xvid it was, was completely different from any of the short feature films i'd been downloading that looked and sounded fantastic.
WMP recognised it as a different file than the other xvids, as the icon was different and my dvd player that plays xvids wouldn't play it.
What is the easiest and most efficient software I could use to convert this massive mpeg into nice xvid.

Thanks
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 09:20 PM

I think you might be using "xvid" as an umbrella term for h.264-based codecs, of which there are many, xvid itself being one. Technically, h.264 is itself a variety of MPEG, being fully titled MPEG-4 part 10: AVC/H.264.

This is therefore going to be a generalised discussion about picking the right codec and file format for the job.

They are usually capable of pretty decent results, but the question, as with anything like this, is who will be playing it back, and on what. Xvid in particular is not playable on default installations of most operating systems, whereas the Quicktime variant of h.264 is playable on any system which has Quicktime installed (default on all Macs and easy to get on PCs). This part of the equation is dependent on how tech savvy your target audience are and how you trade off technical complexity against picture quality - Quicktime is easy to install but other decoders are capable of handling files with more advanced encoding, and thereby better quality-versus-filesize performance.

Further, you face an issue of what hardware your target audience uses. You're talking about standard-definition DV, which is playable as h.264 on any even reasonably recent computer. Go to HD, though, and the sheer processing load of decoding these advanced formats becomes too much for all but the best equipment.

Understanding all this, in your circumstances, I'd suggest one of two approaches. Either:

- If you and your audience are less tech savvy, buy Quicktime Pro and encode to h.264 with that. All the settings are in dropdown boxes and it's generally straightforward and easy to use.

- If you are tech savvy, use something like ffmpeg (google for information) to compress to arbitrary h.264, and tell your audience to use something like VLC media player to play it back. This will offer somewhat better performance both in terms of perceived image quality and encoding time, and although ffmpeg is kind of techy, installing VLC is barely more difficult than Quicktime. VLC is a media player which is capable of handling an extremely wide variety of formats, and well worth having around anyway.

P
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#3 Karel Bata

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 05:52 AM

http://www.videohelp.com/convert

http://download.cnet...l?tag=mncol;pop

;)
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