Jump to content


Photo

Tech Scouts


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Nikita K Carpenter Jr

Nikita K Carpenter Jr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Student
  • Savannah, GA

Posted 21 April 2009 - 02:10 PM

When you go on one, what kinds of questions do you ask your director? gaffer? And I'd like to know oddly enough what you'd ask your Steadicam Op.
  • 0

#2 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 21 April 2009 - 02:45 PM

What's for lunch?


I couldn't resist. Where can you put lights, where does the generator go, can you get in and out, where do the trucks go, sun direction, is one location better than the other, can a crane operate safely, is there parking, can you make noise, is there a curfew, what will it look like when we shoot, will you need extra security. You're mostly looking for problems and solutions. A lot of times it's just a tour.
  • 0

#3 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 21 April 2009 - 02:58 PM

With the Steadicam you ask, "Where will you look good standing next to your rig? Here or there?" Steadicam is a terrain sensitive piece of equipment. It is highly influenced by the elements, like wind, water and the surface over which the Steadicam will travel. It gives the operator a chance to see what he will be walking across. Thick gravel is difficult, as are hills, rocks and narrow passages. The Steadicam operator doesn't normally go on a tech scout. For the most part Steadicam operators are day players unless they are on the film as an operator as well. A Steadicam operator can work a deal with production and can often get on as an operator. In my opinion it is better to have an operator for each camera. Steadicam is grueling work and at the end of a Steadicam set up, the operator needs a break. That being said, operators in general don't really need to go on tech scouts. You can pretty much figure out the shot when you block, set-up and rehearse. It is often an added expense for production to take an operator along and they might not want to pay you. The DP can pretty much fill you in.
  • 0

#4 Nikita K Carpenter Jr

Nikita K Carpenter Jr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Student
  • Savannah, GA

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:33 AM

Excellent. That helps a lot. Actually, it helps a ton. Thank you. Do you usually go in smaller groups or bigger ones?
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7116 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:36 AM

Depends on the Production. Normally, though you'd want your "keys" with you. Sometimes might be 1 small van, other times, might be a big bus or two..
  • 0

#6 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 22 April 2009 - 12:34 PM

Generally speaking a tech scout on a feature film production is the one opportunity that the whole production team (director, 1st AD, exec and other producers, UPM, all the heads of all departments involved [except wardrobe and hair and make-up] and their keys, and even the production coordinator sometimes) will have to go through the scene / location together before the actual filming and work out any and all details related to the scene to be shot that day _ including (but not limited to) logistics like parking working trucks, placement of lights / rigging and other picture needs, art department details, surveying the set, how the scene will be blocked etc.

So any and all questions related to that location's filming should be addressed at the tech scout, as there won't be another such opportunity until it the day of the shoot, and failure to do so will likely be regarded as unprofessional later.

One of the true measures of a good film professional is to anticipate issues and needs so that he or she is prepared for them when and if they are encountered -therefore the tech scout is an incredibly important part of this process, along with previous professional experience of course.

The Steadicam op is generally not present, although in certain demanding situations he / she could very well be involved, it depends on that particular production circumstances. If the DP and director think the Steadicam op should be present to work out complex camera moves, then that is related to production so that it can be approved by the UPM ahead of time.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 22 April 2009 - 12:38 PM.

  • 0

#7 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:11 PM

Others things as well. Such as: where will holding be; craft services; bathrooms; HMW; staging areas for camera, sound, G&E; elevator access; etc.
  • 0


Technodolly

Opal

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineLab

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

CineTape