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how to date film


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#1 Tom Pollock

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 07:22 PM

I have a factory sealed can of 7218-161-3001, does anyone know the date of this film?
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:26 PM

I have a factory sealed can of 7218-161-3001, does anyone know the date of this film?


I would suggest flowers and candy. Film likes nice quiet restaurants off the beaten path and perhaps a long walk in the moonlight by the river.

7218-161-3001 has been known to be very fickle, so don't call her for a few days after the date, play hard to get.

R,
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#3 David Rakoczy

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:29 PM

:lol: ... o1 loves to be out in the sunlight and 19 enjoys the nightlife!.... 12 is super sharp but either way they all love being exposed to something new and different!
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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 11:47 AM

I have a factory sealed can of 7218-161-3001, does anyone know the date of this film?

EKC should know.

Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester NY

Edited by Simon Wyss, 23 April 2009 - 11:49 AM.

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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 11:58 AM

I would suggest flowers and candy. Film likes nice quiet restaurants off the beaten path and perhaps a long walk in the moonlight by the river.

7218-161-3001 has been known to be very fickle, so don't call her for a few days after the date, play hard to get.

R,


:wub:

Seriously, film is like a pretty woman, eating up all of one's money, time, and attention. And it is always *your fault* if things don't come out OK :rolleyes:

Kodak used to have edgecodes with the date stamped in. I forget how it is done now, but there is still a latent image manufacture date, if I recall correctly.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 01:19 PM

Seriously, film is like a pretty woman, eating up all of one's money, time, and attention. And it is always *your fault* if things don't come out OK :rolleyes:


Thank you for my new signature line.
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#7 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 01:56 PM

I would suggest flowers and candy. Film likes nice quiet restaurants off the beaten path and perhaps a long walk in the moonlight by the river.

7218-161-3001 has been known to be very fickle, so don't call her for a few days after the date, play hard to get.

R,


Don't forget to remove the core. That's if you have to. Yeah, I went there.
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#8 John Sprung

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 03:26 PM

Kodak used to have edgecodes with the date stamped in. I forget how it is done now, but there is still a latent image manufacture date, if I recall correctly.


Yes, there's a bunch of coded stuff in the latent image, circles, triangles, squares, etc, one code per year. They have a 20 year cycle of these edge codes, so the same code could be 1927, 1947, 1967, 1987, 2007, etc. Your Kodak rep can get them deciphered for you. For the OP, they can also tell you the date from the number on the can, 7218-161-3001.





-- J.S.
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#9 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 09:40 PM

Yes, there's a bunch of coded stuff in the latent image, circles, triangles, squares, etc, one code per year. They have a 20 year cycle of these edge codes, so the same code could be 1927, 1947, 1967, 1987, 2007, etc. Your Kodak rep can get them deciphered for you. For the OP, they can also tell you the date from the number on the can, 7218-161-3001.


I THINK that the negative films have a two letter date code as part of the Keycode number, while they went to open dating (just the year) on print films. The Kodak web site did have the 2 letter codes for a while but I think they did not have the current ones..

Other stock may still use the "dot Plus Square" type codes.
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#10 K Borowski

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 11:41 PM

Yes, there's a bunch of coded stuff in the latent image, circles, triangles, squares, etc, one code per year. They have a 20 year cycle of these edge codes, so the same code could be 1927, 1947, 1967, 1987, 2007, etc. Your Kodak rep can get them deciphered for you. For the OP, they can also tell you the date from the number on the can, 7218-161-3001.





-- J.S.


DO they really still have the circles triangles and squares?

[Reaches for rack of 16mm negatives/positives to see for himself. . .]
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#11 K Borowski

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 11:48 PM

At least with 16mm Reversal, circa 2004, they just typed out the date of manufacture. . .

P.S. Chris: Feel free to quote me, but leave my name out. Lol. I have enough time picking up chicks so as it is, without having thousands and thousands of hits with my name in it and this exagerated (but completely true :-p ) analogy thrown in. B)
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#12 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 11:51 PM

P.S. Chris: Feel free to quote me, but leave my name out. Lol. I have enough time picking up chicks so as it is, without having thousands and thousands of hits with my name in it and this exagerated (but completely true :-p ) analogy thrown in. B)


It's a curse I know all too well. :lol:
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#13 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 02:29 AM

DO they really still have the circles triangles and squares?

[Reaches for rack of 16mm negatives/positives to see for himself. . .]

The date codes now differ from stock to stock. Quite a number of stocks have the date in plain lettering, some stocks still use the two letter code, the corresponding dates appear on the Kodak website. Ther are also stocks that do not have a date code and I have come across some 35mm B/W Pos 2302 that has K.ODAK 9 12 11 10 9 8 the first 9 is the strip number, the last 5 numbers indicate the year. This was 2008, for 2009 the 8 will have been removed.
Brian
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#14 John Sprung

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 12:13 PM

... I have come across some 35mm B/W Pos 2302 that has K.ODAK 9 12 11 10 9 8 the first 9 is the strip number, the last 5 numbers indicate the year. This was 2008, for 2009 the 8 will have been removed.


This looks like the way that book publishers do "printing" numbers. The plate originally has the numbers counting down from 10 to 1, and each time they set up a new printing, they cut away the previous number. Perhaps the Kodak guys paint out the last year's number in January.




-- J.S.
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#15 Hal Smith

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 05:15 PM

"How to Date Film?"

Take it out to dinner and see what develops later?
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#16 Dan Diaconu M

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 01:21 AM

I would suggest flowers and candy. Film likes nice quiet restaurants.....

No no no no NO. You got it all wrong friend. That's for a different kind of animal.
May I suggest "lens and shutter"? (and if that don't work, try claw and registration pin although sounds like grab and rape)

PS. Don't use cannons to kill mosquitoes.
(flowers'n candy 4 film. Sheesh.....)
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#17 John Sprung

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 01:52 AM

Take it out to dinner and see what develops later?


Take it out to a movie .... Hmmm, it *is* a movie..... ;-)



-- J.S.
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#18 Hal Smith

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 11:09 AM

Take it out to a movie .... Hmmm, it *is* a movie..... ;-)


I wonder if exposing it to something cultural like a museum would help to break the ice?
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#19 Tom Jensen

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 11:46 AM

I wonder if exposing it to something cultural like a museum would help to break the ice?


CAN WE PLEASE GET BACK ON TOPIC? Who am I kidding? I'm just bitter that the last film I dated never called. I'm so lonely.
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#20 K Borowski

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 04:17 PM

Painful groan. . .
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