Jump to content


Photo

Capturing sparks, smoke etc


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Steve Mclean

Steve Mclean

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 April 2009 - 01:46 PM

Hi, my first post here and i'm looking for some advice if possible. I need to create a shot of a cigarette flying through the air and striking an object. If possible i'd like to capture the cigarette in motion as well as the embers, ash etc as it strikes the object. This is also going to be a slow motion shot filmed on Super 16.

I was thinking of shooting against a black background but wondering how i can setup the lighting for this type of shot so i can still capture the cigarette. Is it just a case of separating the lighting from the background. Any ideas or tips would be most welcome.

Thanks.
  • 0

#2 Scott Fritzshall

Scott Fritzshall
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 April 2009 - 05:44 PM

It sounds like you're shooting this as an element to be composited into a plate, is this correct? If so, is there a reason you can't just get this in-camera on set?

If you're doing it as an element, you want to have the lighting on the cigarette be as similar as possible to the lighting on set. Shoot it against an unlit duvatene (or however you spell it) backdrop.
  • 0

#3 Steve Mclean

Steve Mclean

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:22 PM

Thanks for the reply Scott. Yes, this is going to be composited. The reason for shooting separately is the object it's going to strike is a human face, an eye to be exact, camera looking from the side. If i could figure a way to get this in-camera it would make things much easier. Perhaps some way of using a dummy head and replacing with the actual head though i think that would be tough to do. Any thoughts?

My only concern with the shooting separate is because we're using Super 16, film grain and whether we can capture at high enough fps without having to boost the lighting and having too much motion blur.
  • 0

#4 Scott Fritzshall

Scott Fritzshall
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:55 PM

It will be grainy, but you can deal with it. You'll probably mostly be doing luma keying for the sparks, and you can just roto the cigarette. You'll have to boost the lighting according to your fps; there isn't any way around that. Motion blur isn't really a problem; you'll deal with that either through keying or by adding the appropriate falloff in your roto. You might want to shoot additional spark elements so that you can add them to taste, since you might not get the look you're going for with a single shot.
  • 0

#5 Steve Mclean

Steve Mclean

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:34 PM

Thanks for the help Scott.
  • 0

#6 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 April 2009 - 12:59 AM

Another thought -- If you have access to welding equipment, wafting a little extra oxygen in the path of the cigarette may make it burn somewhat brighter.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#7 Steve Mclean

Steve Mclean

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 April 2009 - 02:00 PM

Thanks for the tip John, i appreciate it.
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Glidecam

CineLab

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Opal

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam