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Overactive apocrine glands?


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#1 Scott Bryant

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 08:44 PM

Am I the only one whose arms get hot and perspire in a film changing bag? It was so much so that the magazine came out looking damp and it makes me nervous for getting the film wet. I actually don't think it is sweat, I think it is the condensation on the bag from my body heat just like fogging up a tent or a car at night. Has anyone experienced this? Is there a way around it?
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#2 Tom Jensen

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 08:47 PM

Time to move up.
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#3 jason musgrave

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 02:27 AM

Am I the only one whose arms get hot and perspire in a film changing bag? It was so much so that the magazine came out looking damp and it makes me nervous for getting the film wet. I actually don't think it is sweat, I think it is the condensation on the bag from my body heat just like fogging up a tent or a car at night. Has anyone experienced this? Is there a way around it?


How long are you in the bag for? If you are slow in the bag you will start to sweat but if you are only in there for a minute or 2 you should be fine. :)
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#4 Scott Bryant

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 09:46 AM

How long are you in the bag for? If you are slow in the bag you will start to sweat but if you are only in there for a minute or 2 you should be fine. :)


Perhaps that is it. I'm loading NPR mag's and it takes me a few minutes so I guess I just need to speed it up.
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 12:15 PM

We all sweat in the bag on occasion I'd say... Hard not to when it's 100F+ on set.....
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 12:24 PM

[100+°F/~40+°C]

Even if it is nervous sweat, that comes from being inexperienced, or in my case, allowing myself too little time to load film.

Of course, there's nothing you can do about it when some jerk 2nd AC has you running around on too tight a deadline (except gently explaining that rushed people are more prone to making mistakes), but you should get to the point where you are confident in doing this. Don't ever get cocky confident about loading film, or casual about loading, but get to the point where you aren't terrified of making mistakes.

Still meticulously double check to make sure the bag is closed, without holes, and you don't have an LCD watch on though!

And yeah, only time I ever had a real problem with sweat was in situations that Adrian described. It's a black bag. Be smart about where you use it, especially keeping in mind that if your hands are annoyed by the heat, 500T film will be too!

So for the film's sake if not your nervous hands, find a cool, discreet place out of direct sunlight, like an AC'ed van to load.
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#7 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 12:26 PM

For me, though, it's never the heat, but the Humidity, and here in Philadelphia it can get insanely muggy.
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 12:32 PM

Yeah, that's a good point Adrian. The higher the humidity, the greater the impact of the heat.

Even if you can't get a van with AC in which to load, probably someone has some ice-packs, ice, or cold towels to use (outside the bag of course!).
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#9 Marc Alucard

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 02:13 PM

[100+°F/~40+°C]

Even if it is nervous sweat, that comes from being inexperienced, or in my case, allowing myself too little time to load film.

Of course, there's nothing you can do about it when some jerk 2nd AC has you running around on too tight a deadline (except gently explaining that rushed people are more prone to making mistakes), but you should get to the point where you are confident in doing this. Don't ever get cocky confident about loading film, or casual about loading, but get to the point where you aren't terrified of making mistakes.

Still meticulously double check to make sure the bag is closed, without holes, and you don't have an LCD watch on though!

And yeah, only time I ever had a real problem with sweat was in situations that Adrian described. It's a black bag. Be smart about where you use it, especially keeping in mind that if your hands are annoyed by the heat, 500T film will be too!

So for the film's sake if not your nervous hands, find a cool, discreet place out of direct sunlight, like an AC'ed van to load.


Karl is right, finding a cool place is the best solution.

I loaded and unloaded thousands of radiography plates for equine veterinary use in the bag here in Las Vegas, Nevada in brutal heat. If you can't find a cooler spot to load, I always brought a fan.

We are in our third year using a digital radiography capture system and I REALLY don't miss the bag. We shoot @ 4K X 2K on a 8 X 10 plate.

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#10 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 03:00 PM

You've replaced a 500MP imaging system with an 8MP one? Really?
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#11 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 03:02 PM

*Edit: Assuming that a B&W megapixel is the same as a regular one (maybe you have to divide this all by three if you want to be correct), 8x10" was 780MP or so. . .
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#12 Marc Alucard

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 06:09 PM

*Edit: Assuming that a B&W megapixel is the same as a regular one (maybe you have to divide this all by three if you want to be correct), 8x10" was 780MP or so. . .


Remember even the finest grain sheet X ray film is only capturing a shadow picture of the phosphors on the screen in the film plate or cassette then exposing the film so actual resolution on film is less than to start with.

It is a DICOM format image which is a medical imaging standard. I down converted it to a JPEG to save space in the post. I also removed the Client name, acquisition info, and annotations.

The plate captures 4096 X 2048 There is a lot of software involved. Enhancement algorithms utilizing known anatomy and viewing adjustments as well as brightness , contrast, measurement and magnification. The instant viewing in the field or barn are part of the process that streamline the work flow.

It is nice to not have to maintain a processor and spend the darkroom time to see if you got your shot.

DICOM
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#13 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:04 PM

Remember even the finest grain sheet X ray film is only capturing a shadow picture of the phosphors on the screen in the film plate or cassette then exposing the film so actual resolution on film is less than to start with.

DICOM


I could've sworn that the X-ray film was natively sensitized to X-rays, and you are basically just making, for lack of a better word, a "photogram" by contact printing the actual part onto the film.

So there is actually some sort of screen that converts the X-rays to, say, UV light in the cassette?


As for not getting the shot, I remember asking the X-ray technician at my last dental exam how she could be so sure she had gotten the shot with such a small X-ray source. She said that, with practice, they are really hard to screw up or mis-point the source. Perhaps it's different with 8x10" sheets though.

I did have a digital X-ray taken once, a couple of years ago at the hospital. Despite it being digital, they still had some sort of $10,000 sensor in a very similar cassette. They didn't need to process it, but they still had to take it somewhere and offload the information out of the room.

So there are some very surprising problems that they seem to be having.
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#14 Marc Alucard

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:29 PM

I could've sworn that the X-ray film was natively sensitized to X-rays, and you are basically just making, for lack of a better word, a "photogram" by contact printing the actual part onto the film.

So there is actually some sort of screen that converts the X-rays to, say, UV light in the cassette?


As for not getting the shot, I remember asking the X-ray technician at my last dental exam how she could be so sure she had gotten the shot with such a small X-ray source. She said that, with practice, they are really hard to screw up or mis-point the source. Perhaps it's different with 8x10" sheets though.

I did have a digital X-ray taken once, a couple of years ago at the hospital. Despite it being digital, they still had some sort of $10,000 sensor in a very similar cassette. They didn't need to process it, but they still had to take it somewhere and offload the information out of the room.

So there are some very surprising problems that they seem to be having.


I'm doing radiology on horses at off site locations. A reshoot due to motion blur or a my bad require a new free of charge farm visit with a couple of hours travel time before you hit the darkroom.

The is CR (computed radiography) that uses a cassette with a plate that needs to be read, and erased for reuse that your hosital used, and DR (digital radiography) that uses primarily an amorphous silicon plate (about $50k) that is hard wired to the acquisition unit(about another $50k). (this is the system we use)

Most people don't realize photo chemical radiology employs a screen to produce the image on film with visible light when the phosphors are excited by the X-Ray generator. This reduces expose for the patient and the practitioner.

X-Rays


BTW- Missing Cleveland at all? I've been gone to the desert for 21 years myself.
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#15 K Borowski

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:47 PM

I'm doing radiology on horses at off site locations. A reshoot due to motion blur or a my bad require a new free of charge farm visit with a couple of hours travel time before you hit the darkroom.


A lot of the companies that still do mobile film X-rays have darkroom vans that offer (more or less) on-site processing. It's only the matter of a short walk out to the back of the van. I thought that was commonplace.
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#16 Marc Alucard

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 08:09 PM

A lot of the companies that still do mobile film X-rays have darkroom vans that offer (more or less) on-site processing. It's only the matter of a short walk out to the back of the van. I thought that was commonplace.


We carry a truckload of other veterinary equipment including ultrasound. We talked about hauling a processor but temperature extremes in the required trailer / darkroom even with climate control seemed like a bad idea instead of investing in the Digital system. It takes awesome radiographs and you can carry it on an airplane. I don't miss the processor at all.

Some mobile X-Ray outfits used the Polaroid radiology stuff too.
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