Jump to content


Photo

Bolex Stop Motion


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Adam Brixey

Adam Brixey

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Student
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 02 May 2009 - 10:21 PM

I shot a stop-motion portion for a short last week, and the footage came back overexposed. I know the aperture was set appropriately, camera was fine for everything else I shot.

Not using an animation motor. I'll make sure the knob is set to "I" and not "T" this time. although the exposure - though blown out- was consistent with the last batch of film, so I don't think that was the problem.

Thus my question - I read something that said the single frame exposure takes everything at 1/30 sec shutter speed. Is this true - it doesn't move the shutter according to the frame rate you set?

I know that it can be a little inconsistent working off the spring and not a motor...

Thanks anyone who took the time to check out my question
  • 0

#2 Glenn Brady

Glenn Brady
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:38 AM

You don't indicate what Bolex camera you're using (they're different), but with the speed control knob set anywhere between 18 and 64 f.p.s., the exposure control knob set to the 'T' position, and the shutter fully open on my Bolex H8 RX4, the single frame exposure is 1/30th of a second (the adapted speed, accounting for light loss to the reflex prism, is 1/40th of a second). The same single frame exposure time applies to the H16 RX4.
  • 0

#3 Adam Brixey

Adam Brixey

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Student
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 03 May 2009 - 03:13 PM

Thank you very much, Glenn. Mine is a RX5, my apologies for forgetting to mention that.
  • 0

#4 Herb Montes

Herb Montes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Other
  • Gulf Coast of Texas

Posted 04 May 2009 - 06:59 AM

Did you have the shutter on the viewfinder closed when you shot the footage? When you don't have your eye on the viewfinder stray light can get through your viewfinder and fog the film while making exposures.

Edited by Herb Montes, 04 May 2009 - 07:00 AM.

  • 0

#5 Adam Brixey

Adam Brixey

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Student
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 05 May 2009 - 12:08 AM

Good point - this is my first time doing stop motion with the camera, so I hadn't thought of that. Will remember to do that next time.

Thanks Herb!
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

CineLab

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Technodolly

CineTape

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport