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Daylight Film?


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#1 Jase Ryan

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 08:06 PM

I'm shooting a film soon on 35mm where 90% takes place inside. A major scene of the film takes place in a classroom with windows, that will be the motivated light source. In reality, there would be a florescent lights on inside as well, but I think I'll stick with daylight sources. Would you only go with shooting daylight film? Or would you shoot Tungsten with 85 filter to keep consistency with film throughout???

Thanks.

Jase
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#2 Bruce Greene

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 09:49 PM

I'm shooting a film soon on 35mm where 90% takes place inside. A major scene of the film takes place in a classroom with windows, that will be the motivated light source. In reality, there would be a florescent lights on inside as well, but I think I'll stick with daylight sources. Would you only go with shooting daylight film? Or would you shoot Tungsten with 85 filter to keep consistency with film throughout???

Thanks.

Jase


I would shoot the tungsten film with the 85 filter to keep the film stock order simple. I would consider replacing the florescent bulbs in the classroom with daylight balanced florescent bulbs to keep the color temp consistent with the window light.

Enjoy your shoot!
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#3 Jase Ryan

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Posted 06 May 2009 - 03:55 PM

I would shoot the tungsten film with the 85 filter to keep the film stock order simple. I would consider replacing the florescent bulbs in the classroom with daylight balanced florescent bulbs to keep the color temp consistent with the window light.

Enjoy your shoot!



Can you put the keno tubes in any standard florescent ballast? Is it just as simple as popping out the regular florescent tubes and popping in the Kenos???

Thanks.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 May 2009 - 04:40 PM

Can you put the keno tubes in any standard florescent ballast? Is it just as simple as popping out the regular florescent tubes and popping in the Kenos???

Thanks.


Yes, if they are the same type of tubes (T12, T8, etc.) You have to check that before ordering the tubes. Now if there are a LOT of tubes, most shows opt to replace them with Chroma 50's, which are cheaper -- they have a bit more green in them than Kinos but it's acceptable.

As for 250D versus 500T, it just depends. On a feature, I don't think keeping track of two stock orders as being difficult -- and I will tend to order a little more of the 500T and a little less of the 250D from my calculations just because it's easier to shoot a day interior scene on 500T with a filter than the other way around, so I give myself that wiggle room. It's the same when I shoot on both 200T and 500T, I figure I can always shoot a scene on 500T that was planned for the slower stock if I had to.

So you just have to decide how hard it would be to keep track of more than one stock in terms of usage and ordering.

It also depends on color bias -- I sometimes like shooting tungsten in daytime with a partial correction or no correction for a cooler cast, whereas with 250D, I've basically decided that I want a normal to warm bias.

But in general I prefer the look of the 250D stocks over 500T in daytime, and prefer not having to use extra glass in front of the lens, especially if I already plan on using a diffusion filter on everything. When 5219 Vision-3 500T came out, the improvement in grain made it so close to 250D that I haven't used Kodak 250D in a while, but now that there is a Vision-3 250D, I can't wait to use it.

With Fuji, I prefer using in the Eterna 250D when I can instead of filtering the 500T.

I tend to either shoot a feature on 100T, 200T, and 500T... or 50D, 250D, and 500T (in Kodak terms). I go back and forth, it tends to be determined by the amount of blueness I want in the photography. If the movie is going to have a lot of day scenes with a cool bias, then I tend to use tungsten stocks to give me the option of doing a partial correction or no correction.

For example, "Northfork" was mostly shot on Fuji 125T and 400T, whereas "Astronaut Farmer" (which is a warmer-looking movie) was shot on Fuji 64D, 250D, and 500T.
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#5 Jase Ryan

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 09:33 AM

Great advice David. Thanks.
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