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#1 Andrew Riggs

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 09:52 PM

Hey Everybody,
I'm looking at purchasing some stands for personal use and was wondering what others thought about these three companies and their products. I've used all three and feel they function very similarly so I was curious to see if anyone had opinions as to how they hold up to the rigors of continual use (ie. Does any company use stronger or thicker steel in their products, knuckles are easier to use, knobs less likely to bend, etc). I'm looking to get a decent variety from 40" C's to some Hi-HI Rollers and Mombo Combo's but not going as big as cranks. Any input from anybody who's a little less green than I am would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Riggs
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#2 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 10:51 PM

Yes, functionally, they are all basically the same. For standard c-stands (and its variations), I tend to like Matthews the best. Stay away from Norms.

-DW
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#3 robert duke

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Posted 06 May 2009 - 01:37 AM

Yes, functionally, they are all basically the same. For standard c-stands (and its variations), I tend to like Matthews the best. Stay away from Norms.

-DW

'
I tend to like Modern stands and American 2.5" heads and arms. spend the extra dollar and get thrust bearings for all the heads.
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#4 Valerie Taylor

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Posted 06 May 2009 - 04:56 PM

The proof is always in the pudding...you owe it to yourself to test each of the manufacturers as they all make claims. If I were you I'd go Matthews for the following reasons:

They make arms from both chrome plated steel and stainless steel. The stainless is impervious to the environment and doesn't scratch, peel or rust. They use a serrated pattern in their molds with a metallic, not leather, interface gasket that allows the head to lock firmly in any direction without regard to 'righty tighty / lefty loosy.'

A 4.5" griphead would not normally be subjected to loads equal to a 200lb man, while at Matthews getting a demo one of the sales guys puts a grip arm in the matthews 4.5" griphead and chinned himself repeatedly. Grip equipment is not gymnasium equipment, but it should be built to hold substantial articulated load and provide years of reliable service.

As far as your Hi-His and Mombos, you should always check them out in person to see which you like best because ideally they will last you a decade +, but just in terms of most recent design-mods and leg-strength, maneuverability, flexibility, etc...I think you'll find matthews to be the best of the bunch.

So like I said in the beginning of the post, test them all and get what you like best.

Edited by Valerie Taylor, 06 May 2009 - 05:00 PM.

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#5 robert duke

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 04:45 AM

The proof is always in the pudding...you owe it to yourself to test each of the manufacturers as they all make claims. If I were you I'd go Matthews for the following reasons:

They make arms from both chrome plated steel and stainless steel. The stainless is impervious to the environment and doesn't scratch, peel or rust. They use a serrated pattern in their molds with a metallic, not leather, interface gasket that allows the head to lock firmly in any direction without regard to 'righty tighty / lefty loosy.'

A 4.5" griphead would not normally be subjected to loads equal to a 200lb man, while at Matthews getting a demo one of the sales guys puts a grip arm in the matthews 4.5" griphead and chinned himself repeatedly. Grip equipment is not gymnasium equipment, but it should be built to hold substantial articulated load and provide years of reliable service.

As far as your Hi-His and Mombos, you should always check them out in person to see which you like best because ideally they will last you a decade +, but just in terms of most recent design-mods and leg-strength, maneuverability, flexibility, etc...I think you'll find matthews to be the best of the bunch.

So like I said in the beginning of the post, test them all and get what you like best.


Valerie,
Dont you work for Matthews? I seem to remember getting an email from you.

I like matthews but they are Very proud of their gear. Their prices are 10-20% higher than modern and American.

Edited by robert duke, 08 May 2009 - 04:47 AM.

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#6 David Rakoczy

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:27 AM

American!

Robert is right on about the thrust bearings...
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#7 JD Hartman

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:31 PM

American!

Robert is right on about the thrust bearings...


Not sure I have an heads by American. I can comment on their quality, but I will say that if your paying extra for thrust bearing with your heads, be certain that what is provided is an actual thrust bearing, not just a cheap radial bearing like those found on Avenger heads. I'm not a big fan of the stainless steel trend in stands and grip arms. How many times do you set up in the rain? Anything wrong with giving your wet equipment a wipedown when you wrap? Stainless steel (depending on the alloy) can be both heavier and weaker than its mild steel counterpart. I'd rather have steel hardware that is yellow zinc plated like American's grip gear.
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#8 robert duke

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Posted 10 May 2009 - 11:10 PM

How many times do you set up in the rain? Anything wrong with giving your wet equipment a wipedown when you wrap? Stainless steel (depending on the alloy) can be both heavier and weaker than its mild steel counterpart.


Shooting in the south all the time. We shoot rain or shine. and at least once on every movie. I dont have a problem wiping my gear down, but the producers do.
stainless is heavier and needs special care with cleaning. but its longevity is great.
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#9 Valerie Taylor

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 02:06 PM

Valerie,
Dont you work for Matthews? I seem to remember getting an email from you.

I like matthews but they are Very proud of their gear. Their prices are 10-20% higher than modern and American.


^^^^^

Generally with this type of thing if there is a 10-20% price difference on a stand it will be due to either the material used in manufacture - steel vs. stainless vs. chrome-plated - the way it is manufactured - castings vs. welds and machining - what is added vs. what is taken away, an additional component on a stand, etc...it really is worth it to find out, especially for the context in which the equipment will be used. 20% is a big variable.

Matthews people are proud of the products and I think that is a good thing.

My motto, however, is when you buy gear you always have to get what you want. This is a life motto, by the way! :) If that is American or Modern, then that's great. Of course Matthews wants the opportunity to get the business as does anyone else, but ultimately like I said its about testing it to see what you like and then buying based on that. You'll get what you pay for. And if you don't, go back to the manufacturer to figure out why because with the cost of some of this stuff you're owed it, know what I mean? That goes for Matthews as much as Modern, Norms, American, what have you - I'm speaking as a consumer here.

You probably did get an email from me, I designed the website and occasionally answer questions.
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#10 Tim Tyler

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 08:27 PM

You probably did get an email from me, I designed the website and occasionally answer questions.


Valerie,

You have a @msegrip.com email address.

It's OK to talk up your products here. In fact industry rep participation is encouraged, You need to identify yourself though to avoid confusion or appearing as a shill.

Just add (MSE) to your Display Name, and/or create a signature with your job title and company.
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#11 Valerie Taylor

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 11:31 AM

Valerie,

You have a @msegrip.com email address.

It's OK to talk up your products here. In fact industry rep participation is encouraged, You need to identify yourself though to avoid confusion or appearing as a shill.

Just add (MSE) to your Display Name, and/or create a signature with your job title and company.


I'm sorry Tim. I thought I had done my profile correctly as in that my information was visible to all. I apparently wasn't paying enough attention when I set up the account.

Edited by Valerie Taylor, 12 May 2009 - 11:35 AM.

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#12 JD Hartman

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 12:36 PM

Chrome plating is fine, when its "tripple chrome plate", which is the proper way to achive a long lasting chrome finish. First a layer of copper, then a second layer of nickle and finally a layer of chrome. Does MSE or any of the grip companies do this? The protective plating is moot when it a welded item like a pigeon, as the ones I've seen are welded together after the plating process, which burns through the plating.
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#13 Valerie Taylor

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 06:48 PM

JD,

What you just described is the process for old-fashioned bumper chrome...the government prohibits that, and while there are some platers still doing it in a covert manner for those who restore old vehicles, plating today must conform to AQMD and EPA rules and regulations, which admittedly are lesser in quality to the old-school chrome. C'est la vie. :)
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#14 David Rakoczy

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 08:55 PM

Chroming techniques aside... (in my opinion) American Grip builds the best Grip Equipment on the planet... hands down!
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#15 JD Hartman

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 10:39 AM

JD,

What you just described is the process for old-fashioned bumper chrome...the government prohibits that, and while there are some platers still doing it in a covert manner for those who restore old vehicles, plating today must conform to AQMD and EPA rules and regulations, which admittedly are lesser in quality to the old-school chrome. C'est la vie. :)


I wasn't aware of that. Yes there are still platers that do that type of work. Very few plating shops of any kind exist today, due to EPA regulations. From my experience in the fastener industry, I'd have to say that yellow zinc would be the most weather resistant finish obtainable today.
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