Jump to content


Photo

How do I get this image back?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Jake Windhurst

Jake Windhurst
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 May 2009 - 12:35 AM

Been seraching for the right look for this project i'm doing.
This is my fav
Without color correction

ImageShack - Image Hosting :: nonq.jpg

With
http://img412.images...2/corrected.jpg

Can't remember the settings I had on. Probably Cinemode, but i've tried it with the same f stop shutter speed and db that dvmp said I had on.

Using hv30.

The camera said the f stop was f2.8 and shutter speed was 50 and 6db
Don't know if I was using cinemode or whether it's the white balance that was making the difference.
The main difference between this and other shots that I took was the fact the background and shadows were able to handle alot of contrast, without damagin the subjects facial tone.
The idea behind it, is blazing white background, big shadows and good skin tone from subjects.
Whenever I blaze up the contrast on any other shot the background isn't so gleaming white and the subjects face looks exposed to the max

I used ulead video studio to color correct as my pc can't handle anything else at moment :)
Put contrast to 52/ saturation 6 and hue at 1
  • 0

#2 Stuart Page

Stuart Page
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 13 May 2009 - 01:28 AM

For me the key light is too close (squinting more in nearest eye to light), and low to the subject, (that's a rather ugly nose shadow), but maybe that's what you intended?

Depending on what format you're shooting, it might be best to shoot fairly straight and try to replicate the "look" in post.
  • 0

#3 Jake Windhurst

Jake Windhurst
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 May 2009 - 08:52 AM

Problem is that was post

Here is the none corrected
http://img11.imagesh...?image=nonq.jpg

Whenever I film it now with the exact same set up, and try to replicate the settings, get to post and up the contrast, subject becomes too exposed and the background nowhere near as white.

Yes it was intended by the way.
Like I said the idea is white background, massive cast shadow, and subject's face not totally destroyed with exposure. Anyway I can get closer to achieving this with any method you can think?
How good will post in after effects be as I can't use it on this pc. as it's absolutely smashed.
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7375 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 May 2009 - 08:58 AM

Don't up contrast, use color correction to just blow out the whites. It's not really a contrast thing. FCP/AVID/and Premier Pro all have color correctors which might help, but in truth, if you didn't light it right..... ya know?
It looks liek your skintones /bg whites are way too close to each other to really be controlled independent. It's much less a camera setting and more so a lighting setting.
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7375 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 May 2009 - 09:03 AM

I am supposing that you wanted something similar to this? in terms of the white BG... This is uncorreted from XDCam shoot I did last week. BG was just seamless white lit up pretty quickly.
What was important was to keep enough separation between the Dr's skin and the BGs luminance so in post we could blow the whites and after that it looks like....
  • 0

#6 Jake Windhurst

Jake Windhurst
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 May 2009 - 10:53 AM

Thats it.
Only thing is I want cast shadows on the subjects face and the background.
How hard is the seperation going to be with only one light pointing upwards towards the subject?

Do you know much about the hv30 and what settings I should use to be optimum? Aperture or cinemode ?
Should I absoulutely defo not use gain if I want best work done in color correction?
  • 0

#7 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7375 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 May 2009 - 10:57 AM

jake,
What I'd do is treat the subject and the BG separately.
Light the BG first and get it evenly white and then light the subject as well, so his shadow throws onto the BG. You can do it with 1 Light, but, the problem is that you have falloff.. so the BG will always be dimmer then the foreground.
As for the HV30, I used it once in passing but don't know much about it's settings, per-say. I'd assume that cine-mode will throw on a curve, so you might want to avoid that. Do not use gain. Always try to avoid it and get as much in cameras as possible.
  • 0


Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Visual Products

CineLab

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Visual Products

Ritter Battery