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Filtering vs Grading


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#1 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 05:09 PM

Hi!

Shooting a short in June.
Currently in full-on pre-production.
While doing research on stocks, realised I left an important question unanswered.

Shooting tunsgten stock, I want the picture to have a bit of a 'coldness'.
But will not do it through lighting.
Would you suggest a. using filter at all times, b. leaving it to grading?

The factors that may influence the decision:
most probably shooting fairly slow stock - 100 or 200. as well as will be overexposing by 2/3 already, to get less grain.
looking for the tightest grain possible.
the key light sources at most of the times will be HMIs.
will go through grading process after the picture is locked at post-production stage anyway - to even out the shots etc.

Thanks a lot in advance!
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#2 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 05:48 PM

Uh, why won't you do it through lighting? That's pretty much what lighting is for.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 05:55 PM

If you are talking about taking a neutral image and doing an overall shift towards blue, that's pretty simple in post. Just shoot your grey card / scale at the head of the roll with a pale warming filter on, or lit with some slightly warmer light, and once they time that to neutral, the unfiltered footage that follows will be cooler.

Now if you were talking about using the RED camera and tungsten lights, I'd definitely say that you want to achieve blueness through HMI lights, filters, or gels rather than try to time a 3200K image to look more blue.

Of course remember that in daytime scenes on film, you can opt for shooting on tungsten stock and naturally having a lot of blue if you don't filter the image to get 3200K.
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#4 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 11:37 AM

Uh, why won't you do it through lighting? That's pretty much what lighting is for.


It's more of a situational question, really.
I mean my question is more: if NOT correcting the colour with lighting - would you rather do it with filters on lens, or in post?
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#5 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 11:40 AM

If you are talking about taking a neutral image and doing an overall shift towards blue, that's pretty simple in post. Just shoot your grey card / scale at the head of the roll with a pale warming filter on, or lit with some slightly warmer light, and once they time that to neutral, the unfiltered footage that follows will be cooler.


Thanks David!
If image quality and grain size are main priorities, would you say you would prefer to do this kind of shift in post rather than doing it with filters?
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 11:58 AM

Thanks David!
If image quality and grain size are main priorities, would you say you would prefer to do this kind of shift in post rather than doing it with filters?



I'd say that doing it with filters will achieve a better look, most of the time, but you are married to that look. Where as with post you have a multitude of choices. Timing with a warming filter first as David suggested is a great way for an overall shift.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 09:45 PM

Thanks David!
If image quality and grain size are main priorities, would you say you would prefer to do this kind of shift in post rather than doing it with filters?


Depends on the degree of shift you need. A minor shift, I'd rather not put an extra piece of glass in front of the lens for a minor correction. But as I said, it depends on what camera you're talking about because the RED benefits from a blue filters in tungsten light.
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#8 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 12:13 PM

Depends on the degree of shift you need. A minor shift, I'd rather not put an extra piece of glass in front of the lens for a minor correction. But as I said, it depends on what camera you're talking about because the RED benefits from a blue filters in tungsten light.


We will be shooting 16mm.
Yes, I'm talking about very subtle, minor shift.
So, I guess 'post' is the way, in the end of the day.
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