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#1 Sebastian Rivera

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 04:23 PM

I am about to shoot my first super 8mm movie I have two questions

My camara is able to read 160T /100D and 40/25 , Plus X B&W reversal 100D its the best way to go when it comes to my film cam>?
is it possible to do Tri X?


My other question is if I use Plus X 100D in a f/1.3 to f/45 lens Am I going to have to give a lot of light indoors to get good quality or
in a f/1.3 the 100D indoors will be cool with dim lights?

Just trying to avoid mistakes in my first try .

Please help
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#2 Steve Wallace

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 03:26 PM

I am about to shoot my first super 8mm movie I have two questions

My camara is able to read 160T /100D and 40/25 , Plus X B&W reversal 100D its the best way to go when it comes to my film cam>?
is it possible to do Tri X?


My other question is if I use Plus X 100D in a f/1.3 to f/45 lens Am I going to have to give a lot of light indoors to get good quality or
in a f/1.3 the 100D indoors will be cool with dim lights?

Just trying to avoid mistakes in my first try .

Please help


Generally 160/100 40/25 cameras do not read the new Plus-X correctly. I have a Nautica and that is the case. Your experience may very though. You didn't mention what camera you are going to use. If there is a manual setting, use that and you'll be fine.

So if you are shooting indoors, you are probably going to want to use Tri-X instead of Plus-X. It always better to have more light and close the aperture, than to have a dim light and open it up. If you can, stay around the mid f-stops f 4 - f 8, that is generally where your lens is the sharpest on super 8 cams.

Also shoot more in close-up if the story calls for it. The soft image tends to be flattering.
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#3 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 07:09 PM

g'day sebastian,
if your camera says it is a 160/100 and 40/25 camera then it can indeed use Plus-x 100 asa as well as Ektachrome 100d which has the same notch. If those are the only speeds your camera reads, then if you put tri-x in then it will still be exposing for 100asa which is an over exposure (depending on how much light there is of course). You could do the following: cut a filter notch in a cartridge of tri-x. The camera will then read this as a cartridge of 160t. It will also employ the internal filter and thus give exposure readings based on 100 asa again. If you switch off the internal filter of the camera (be it with a switch, filter key or filter screw) the camera will now think you have a roll of 160t with no filter and thus give exposure readings based on 160 asa. This is fine for tri-x.

As for light levels, you won't be able to get away with just domestic practical bulbs. You will need some proper light there.

If you are thinking about exposing manually, do read this:

http://nanolab.com.au/bracketed.htm

cheers,
richard
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:19 AM

Well, it all depends upon the camera.

Some of the later 40/160 models didn't follow the SMPTE standard, where a notchless cartridge kicks down the speed to the lower of the two ASAs that are associated with each speed-notch size. They ignore it instead, and keep the speed at the higher ASA, which is the tungsten rating. So cutting a notch will make no difference.

The reason they did this is so the cameras will be able to read the old "G" film, which is speed-notched at ASA 250T/160D. It was supplied in a notchless cartridge to kick it down to 160 and also disable the unnecessary 85 filter at the same time.

In a SMPTE camera that only goes up to ASA 160, following the SMPTE standard would have set the meter for "G' film to ASA 100, which is way off. So these manufacturers often disabled the daylight/notchless cartridge facility instead of redesigning their meters to read ASA 250 or above.

So the rule is:

SMPTE compliant 40/160 cameras will read Plus-X ok, but not Tri-X, because they will read them both at ASA 100.

Non-compliant 40/160 cameras will read Tri-X ok, but not Plus-X, because they will read Plus-X at ASA 160 and ignore its notchless cartridge.

E100D depends upon how it was notched. Sometimes it's like Plus-X, sometimes they notch it at the straight ASA 100 speed indice, which some cameras can read.

The old Plus -X is treated differently. It was supplied at ASA 50 and in a notched cartridge with a speed indice of ASA 40/25-- just like Kodachrome.
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#5 Jim Carlile

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:30 AM

Well, it all depends upon the camera.

Some of the later 40/160 models didn't follow the SMPTE standard, where a notchless cartridge kicks down the speed to the lower of the two ASAs that are associated with each speed-notch size. They ignore it instead, and keep the speed at the higher ASA, which is the tungsten rating. So cutting a notch will make no difference.

The reason they did this is so the cameras will be able to read the old "G" film, which is speed-notched at ASA 250T/160D. It was supplied in a notchless cartridge to kick it down to 160 and also disable the unnecessary 85 filter at the same time.

In a SMPTE camera that only goes up to ASA 160, following the SMPTE standard would have set the meter for "G' film to ASA 100, which is way off. So these manufacturers often disabled the daylight/notchless cartridge facility instead of redesigning their meters to read ASA 250 or above.

So the rule is:

SMPTE compliant 40/160 cameras will read Plus-X ok, but not Tri-X, because they will read them both at ASA 100. Richard's right-- you can get around this by cutting a filter notch-- then the camera will read Tri-X at ASA 160. But don't cut a notch in Plus-X !

Non-compliant 40/160 cameras will read Tri-X ok, but not Plus-X, because they will read Plus-X at ASA 160 and ignore its notchless cartridge. As above, cutting a filter notch makes no difference in these cameras.

E100D depends upon how it was notched. Sometimes it's like Plus-X, sometimes they notch it at the straight ASA 100 speed indice, which some cameras can read.

The old Plus -X is treated differently. It was supplied at ASA 50 and in a notched cartridge with a speed indice of ASA 40/25-- just like Kodachrome.

Edited by Jim Carlile, 20 May 2009 - 02:31 AM.

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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:33 AM

All this wacky duplication. Ignore the first posting-- the second one corrects it. It wouldn't do it the first time !
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