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KinoFlo vs Softbox


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#1 Tom Savige

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 06:32 PM

Hey Guys,

I'm shooting this weekend and I need a soft light source which would you recommend, A Kino Flo Diva Light 400 or a Lowel Rifa Light 88 (1k Softbox) . They both have their advantages and disadvantages. what are your suggestions?

Cheers
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#2 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 08:10 PM

Hey Guys,

I'm shooting this weekend and I need a soft light source which would you recommend, A Kino Flo Diva Light 400 or a Lowel Rifa Light 88 (1k Softbox) . They both have their advantages and disadvantages. what are your suggestions?

Cheers

Get both
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 02:41 AM

They both have their advantages and disadvantages.


There's your answer. What advantages and disadvantages matter to you?
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#4 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:55 AM

Anyone able to say what the color rendition of a kino-flo is like in practice? After all it is a fluorescent tube and will have spikes. I'm sure it's fine for fill and backgrounds, but how is it for skin tones when used as a key?
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:58 AM

It's in the 90s, 95 IIRC. It's fine for skintones, used all the time. I don't particularly like it -v- a Tungsten unit, but then again I feel the same about HMIs on skintones. Point of fact is, they're used and used wonderfully and are quite useful. I personally find a bit too "cool" of a feeling from 'em though, but you'd need to play 'round with them yourself to see whether or not you like them.
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#6 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 07:22 AM

For a soft source I'll take a Tungsten Lamp thru 216, Tracing Paper etc..., over Kinos any day!

For super soft... bounce a Lamp into a piece of Foamcore and bounce that thru some Opal (we call it a wedge).. BEAUTIFUL!
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#7 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 10:32 AM

Agreed. I don't know anything better. :D And a good way to use blondes. Can lead to lots of flagging though. :(
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#8 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 10:41 AM

If you are not setting a bunch of Stands, where the fun? :lol:
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#9 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 10:53 AM

Other people just don't understand, do they? :)

Actually my preferred soft light is a red or blonde on a stand with half spun onto a frame with trace (or whatever) on another stand. The amount of flood on the lamp combined with its distance and that of the frame give a lot of control over intensity, fall-off, and the degree of hot-spot-ness (there's gotta be a proper term for that). Easy to move around too.

Add to that half a dozen flags... :D
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#10 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 11:08 AM

Amen!

Punching thru double 4x4s or 6x6s is fantastic.

For me, I enjoy the setting up and Lighting of a shot as much as actually rolling or later viewing a shot. Love the equipment.. and love to use it! :wub:

I love using mechanical items for an artistic end!
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#11 Tom Jensen

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 11:17 AM

Amen!

Punching thru double 4x4s or 6x6s is fantastic.

For me, I enjoy the setting up and Lighting of a shot as much as actually rolling or later viewing a shot. Love the equipment.. and love to use it! :wub:

I love using mechanical items for an artistic end!


Just be sure not to exceed the maxiumum C-Stand to Light Ratio or the grips go crazy.
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#12 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 11:35 AM

Well.. I started as a Grip then Electrician then Key Grip.. before Gaffing.. before DPing.. so I am at home in Grip & Electric Jungles... :wub: Just shot some table top close ups of Pills. You should have seen my kitchen/ dining area... Stand forrest. My Ac and I were two happy campers snuggled in a G&E nest :lol:
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#13 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 12:53 PM

"You should have seen my kitchen/ dining area..."

Sort of like this?

Posted Image

Jeez. The rest of us just sit down and eat our lunch without feeling it's got to be lit properly. :o
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#14 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 02:11 PM

Love it!.. very Nice! :)

..didn't quite understand the last sentence tho...
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#15 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 03:17 PM

It was a joke. I was picking up on your saying that you'd set up a complex lighting rig on your dining room table, and was responding as if I had misunderstood your post to mean that you always set up a full lighting rig around your lunch...

Oh, never mind...

Still, I am tempted to install a 200Hz strobe on the ceiling here so I don't get any motion blur as I move my breakfast to my mouth. Gotta keep those corn flakes crisp and shiny!

:D

(Difficult to get to the bathroom in the middle of the night with all these bloody flag stands in the way!)
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#16 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 03:29 PM

:D

Create a path by laying some Track.. that seems to be the only area where lamps and flags aren't set :lol:
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#17 Karel Bata

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 03:48 PM

The stairs are still a problem, what with those pseudo-Hitchcock shadow effects I put in last summer. And I'm not allowed to touch a light switch without an electrician in attendance. It's a nightmare. I tell you those folks living in TV sit-coms with overhead rigs have it easy! :(
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#18 Jean Allard

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 04:26 PM

If you use rented equipment, I'd say avoid Diva lights,
I find them not exactly consistent colorswise, dimming them
does no help. You can get a 4x2'tubes for the same
price, and they usually do better. Divas rellay are just
useful when you are working alone on shoots that you
must set up fast or in documentary.

What I like about stronger soft boxes is that you can
put them farer from your subject and get a better
sun or "light from window" effect I think you can put
2x1k in the lowell' riva. Same thing with
shooting lights trough frames will indeed give you
more control.

peace
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#19 David Rakoczy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:00 PM

The stairs are still a problem, what with those pseudo-Hitchcock shadow effects I put in last summer. And I'm not allowed to touch a light switch without an electrician in attendance. It's a nightmare. I tell you those folks living in TV sit-coms with overhead rigs have it easy! :(


The Reality rigged homes even easier! What with just Kinos...?.. and everything hand held? Easy! :lol: Love your Shadow Stairs!

That picture you posted is as beautiful to me as the shot itself probably is... kinda like the mad scientist who indulges in wild experiments and every time he enters his labor-a-tory.... he grins at his massive set up of beakers, pipettes and test tubes...

Lighting & Grip Rigs themselves are works of art!
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#20 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:00 PM

I've never been happy with the quality of light out of a KINO or DIVA. Plus, it seems harder to control the spill.

I prefer using ARRI fresnels with Chimera's as a key. Either a 1K or 650K usually is enough for a closeup. And depending upon the size of the room, I usually put up a solid to keep the spill off the background.

What's the difference b/n that and a KINO you might ask? ANY light you put up will have some spill, but again, the quality of light coming from a tungsten fresnel source trumps whatever advantage might be gained from a KINO. About the only reason I can think to ever put up a KINO aside from needing to tape it to a wall or other flat surface is the lack of heat it gives out. They are good for long term use, when needing to leave it on all day long in a small place, but otherwise, I prefer the other way.

But that's just me.
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