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What HD Camera


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#1 Michael Frymus

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 09:09 PM

Hey guys, first, I am 18-years old, and I am looking for some equipment to make some movies. Right now, I am looking into making some short films (15-25min. long). I have always wanted to make my own movies. I am making this movie as soon as I get all my equipemnt and stuff. I need to have this film ready by next Spet. '10. It might seem like its a long time away, but by the time I get my stuff, I wont have much time.

I have lists of equipment I would be needing but, I dont know what brand, and what type to use.
One of those items (the most important) is the camera. I am out on the lookout for a camera that will fit my needs.

My first movie I am making is on WWII. This a big deal with costumes and tons of actors. The first important feature into making my movie is the type of camera.
1. I need a shoulder cam.
2. I was watchin 'The making of Saving Private Ryan' Pt.5 where the camera man talks about the lens. He mentioned he had the filter removed to stop the light from bouncing around in the camera to creat the blurred out, dirty, grey sky type of look (without it being out of focus) even during blue sky. However, I still need to make normal movies that do not require this effect.
3. The other most important thing along wit the feature mentioned above is to have it in HD!
4. Basically, as I am young, I dont have a lot of money to spend on this. My budget I would say would be around $3-4K tops. (CAD)


I also have some questions recarding filming and cameras:
1. I noticed that there're a few different types of cameras. Which do you suppose would be best/easiest; have it recorded on a memory card, cassette, or standard movie film? Problem with movie film for me is how to play it, edit it, etc.
2. The camera guy in Saving Private Ryan mentions about using 45deg. and 90deg. shutters. Whats that?
3. What is a good editing program? (PC) & (Mac - dont have)


So, I have quite a big list of requirements for my camera.
Can someone recommend anything for me with my need and at my price range?

Please tell me the name of the camera, where to purchase it(website) and why it is good, as to why it suits me?

Thanks so much!!!
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 06:27 AM

The JVC HD 100 or 200 would be the only shoulder camera roughly in that price range although you could buy a good used camera instead of a new one.

http://pro.jvc.com/p...el_id=MDL101642

http://pro.jvc.com/p...el_id=MDL101623

They produce the most filmic images of the HDV cameras. They handle like the large professional cameras and are good starting point of you wish to go in that direction. The JVC website has a lot of further information.

You can adjust the shutter to give the stroby effect. A film camera rotating shutter is normally half open (180 degrees) to expose the film and the other half closed to move the film to the next frame between exposures. 90 degrees and 45 degrees reduce the exposure time in half with each halving of the shutter angle. The side effect of this is that you get less image blur in the frame to blend the movement and the result is a more jerky effect as in "Saving Private Ryan"
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#3 Michael Frymus

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 10:33 PM

thanks.

I looked over the 'GY-HD110U' before, it seems pretty good but pricy. I browsed around some other stores that sell the same camera and it was a lot cheaper. The shop near me has to be the most expensive, dang!
and thanks for the info.

Any more camera recommendations, tips, or anything, please let me know.
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#4 Michael Frymus

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 10:44 PM

Just an additional quick question..

is it possible to record on a memory chip and then later using some program or some device to get that movie onto film? or you need to record on film first?
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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 05:02 AM

Just an additional quick question..

is it possible to record on a memory chip and then later using some program or some device to get that movie onto film? or you need to record on film first?


I believe you've been asking similar questions on the 35mm forum. The cheapest method to get a 35mm film print would probably be sending your final master material to be transferred using a Cinevator, this can directly produce a 35mm film print with optical sound without intermediate stages.

I think you should do some background reading on film & digital workflows. There are a number of extremely good books which you can either buy or borrow from a library.

There are good cheaper HDV cameras, but they won't be in the shoulder mounted handheld style.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:40 AM

The issue of whether to record to tape or memory cards has nothing to do with transferring your finished project to 35mm. It just affects how you transfer the footage into your computer and in what file format and compression scheme, etc.

With prosumer HD tape, your choice is the HDV format. With memory card cameras, there are a lot of HD codecs, from DVCPRO-HD to AVC-i, AVCCAM, XDCAM (for the Sony EX1 or EX3), all with their issues.

One thing to watch out for is that half these prosumer HD cameras record to 1080i (interlaced-scan) even when capturing in progressive scan like 24P -- they will write the 24P capture to 60i using a pulldown scheme. So you want to make sure your editing software and system is removing the pulldown so you can edit in original whole "P" frames. This will make any film-out work easier later than if you edited 24P as 60i and threw the pulldown cadence out of order.
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#7 Michael Most

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:30 AM

My first movie I am making is on WWII. This a big deal with costumes and tons of actors. The first important feature into making my movie is the type of camera.


I would suggest that the first important feature in making your movie should be a script, a cast, and at least one person who's done this before. A camera choice is the least of your issues.
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#8 andres victorero

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 04:58 PM

I would suggest that the first important feature in making your movie should be a script, a cast, and at least one person who's done this before. A camera choice is the least of your issues.


I´m totally agree. Any digital prosumer cam of today delivers great images, not like a film but works.
A good DP makes the difference not the camera.

Edited by andres victorero, 17 June 2009 - 04:59 PM.

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