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#1 Gordon C

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:01 PM

I know I am retro, but I was thinking of typing my stuff on a manual typewriter. Is there a way to set the margins for a manual typewriter to type my own movie script?
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 05:56 PM

There's a mechanical setting for the margins and you can also set up the tabs for the dialogue etc.

The one advantage a typewriters is that you have to keep moving the story forward, you can't spend time rewriting each sentence over and over again before progressing like you would on a computer. Of course, you have to retype everything during the next rewrite .
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#3 Steve McBride

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 04:17 PM

Usually it's just putting in tabs for your different left side margins. Though I don't really see why you would want to use a typewriter. As Brian said, it helps moving the story forward, but what if you get something done and then when you reread it you misspelled one word? Sure you can white-out it, but that looks messy, you have to retype the entire page. Or what if in a rewrite your last paragraph on a page goes onto the next page, then that page goes to the next. You might have to retype a whole lot just because of one mistake.

There's a reason why scriptwriters use computers nowadays.
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#4 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 05:27 PM

All true.
Embrace progress and get Final Draft - less of a vintage workflow but you will appreciate its many features. No joke!
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#5 Rob Vogt

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:20 PM

Im a firm believer in Celtx scriptwriting software. It's free, or at least it used to be, the new version you may have to pay for or that can just be a monthly subscription fee for posting scripts online or storing them to an external server so multiple writers can edit and re-save instead of having to email back and forth.

Not to mention it's easy and has a nice bit of features as well. You should definitely look into it.

I'm also a fan of typewriters though. I just love that noise of their keys, it makes you feel like you've accomplished something.
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#6 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:34 PM

How about this? http://www.deadlykit...com/typewriter/

http://www.deadlykit...writer/blog.php

;)
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#7 Patrick Neary

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 12:43 AM

I know I am retro, but I was thinking of typing my stuff on a manual typewriter. Is there a way to set the margins for a manual typewriter to type my own movie script?


My wife and I go to a regular arts and lectures series here in portland (visiting authors pontificating about the creative process), and you'd be surprised how many nationally known writers still plunk away on typewriters.

There's a shop close by that still services typewriters (Ace Typewriter) and can bring an old Remington back to showroom quality for less than the cost of a couple reams of paper, I highly recommend them!
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#8 Hal Smith

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 09:17 AM

The better office electrics like my IBM Wheelwriter III have correction ribbons built-in that will erase entire words if not sentences. If you catch a mistake when you make it built-in correction makes it easy to fix.

Of course my Wheelwriter's been on the top shelf of my office closet for at least five years. I stopped using it when just about every application and/or form I ever use got converted to either live on-line or Acrobat form.
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Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Visual Products

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