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Daylight Loading ?


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#1 Roy S

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 05:19 AM

Hi guys,

I just got a 16mm H16 Bolex and i love it allready.
I've almost eliminated every problem but there is a
thing that still remains..

The loading and un-loading aspect..

I've spoken to fuji on the phone about the motion picture film
and fuji said that it was no problem to load the camera in daylight.
Although full sunlight is not to be recommend.

Is this true ? Are the 100 feet rolls designed with
a leader which protects the film ?

So i'm about to order 5 rolls of Fuji 64D for shooting in daylight.


If someone could answer this question i'd be more then happy.

Roy from The Netherlands
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 05:55 AM

The 100 ft rolls have 5 feet of leader at either end. I've loaded a Bolex in full sunlight with daylight rolls and no problems, although I tended to allow a couple of extra feet on the leader because you could get some flashing on the first couple of feet.

However, I would be much more careful if I was shooting Super 16 and load in deep shade or under a coat because you don't have that soundtrack space for that "seepage" effect.

Shade would be safest outdoors.
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#3 Simon Wyss

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 06:08 AM

The 100-foot so-called daylight camera spools have closed blackened flanges and a closed hub. There is always an additional length of film given like 110 foot. You use that length for lacing and as light protection for the inner windings, about 6 foot at the beginning and about 4 foot at the end. Only prevent the outer windings from unrolling by holding the pack together in one hand while you feed the first two foot or a little less with the other hand. Depends on the camera you have. You load and unload the camera in the shadow, when in full sunlight then turn yourself around to cast shadow. Best is to sit somewhere and have the camera on your legs, lens pointing away from you.

The workers with the laboratories have the right to cut off the fogged (additional) lengths and you have the right to get back 100 feet, net (4000 frames). They may splice leader to your original. Help them by producing a first and a last frame, i. e. after threading up you run the film forward through the closed camera (lens hood, variable shutter, reflex viewfinder) until the counter reads Zero. At this point you zero the single frame counter, too. Expose 4000 frames and not more. After that you let the film run out (audible) in the again closed camera. Niet vergeten

All the best for your work!

Edited by Simon Wyss, 27 May 2009 - 06:10 AM.

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#4 Roy S

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 06:45 AM

Thanks for your reply !

It was already what i expected but.. wanted to be very very sure :)

Roy
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#5 Roy S

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 07:08 AM

Oh i forgot something..

I'm about to order F-64 D Film stock. And i read something
about having to compensate exposure ?

So when shooting i just meter at (24 frames p/s and 64 iso) ?
Then the meter gives me a aperture and i set that accordantly ?

Or do i have to compensate for some reason ?

i'm using a Sekonic L-398M light meter by the way

It's kind of confusing for me.. Please help me out please..

Edited by Roy S, 27 May 2009 - 07:13 AM.

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#6 David Auner aac

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 07:42 AM

Oh i forgot something..

I'm about to order F-64 D Film stock. And i read something
about having to compensate exposure ?

So when shooting i just meter at (24 frames p/s and 64 iso) ?
Then the meter gives me a aperture and i set that accordantly ?


Hi Roy,

what kind of Bolex do you have? On a reflex one you'd have to set your meter to 1/80th of a second to compensate for the reflex prism. So set your meter to 1/80th and 64 ISO and you
'll be fine. As your film is negative material err on the side of overexposure! And change your name to first and last name as per forum rules. Happy shooting! ;)

Cheers, Dave
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#7 Roy Sturkenboom

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 08:13 AM

I own a Non-Reflex model. I believe it's the standard H16.

But if it's a non reflex then i don't have to compensate right ?

So i just took a reading in full sunlight with the meter set to 64 iso.
Then when i turned the dail on the meter it gave me a aparture between F/16 and F/11.
Does this sound any good ?

I have a photography background so the whole different exposure system is new to me since this is cinematography
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#8 David Auner aac

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 12:04 PM

I own a Non-Reflex model. I believe it's the standard H16.

But if it's a non reflex then i don't have to compensate right ?


Nope. That's not right. You wouldn't need to compensate when shooting with a 180 degree shutter. Then the exposure time would be 1/n seconds where n is your fps. But the non reflex Bolexes don't have a 180° shutter! What serial no. is your camera? Early cameras before 1004xx have a 192° shutter giving you 1/45 at 24fps and later cameras have a 144° shutter giving you 1/60. If you are shooting neg it's not that critical since you have room for error, but for shooting reversal it would be. And IMO it's better to be precise about things and then experiment from there rather than make guesses!

Regards, Dave

PS: Get these books! They'll answer almost every Bolex question there is and you'd be supporting a really nice and honest guy!
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#9 Roy Sturkenboom

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 03:07 PM

Allright,

The Bolex has a 36127 serialnumber. It's made between 1946 and 1947 i believe.

Thanks for your help Dave.
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#10 David Auner aac

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 01:16 AM

The Bolex has a 36127 serialnumber. It's made between 1946 and 1947 i believe.


Wow, that's the second lowest serial no. I have heard so far. There is one here in Vienna in the range of 106xx, made in 1938! You're right, that no. places it in 46-47!

Cheers, Dave
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#11 Simon Wyss

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 04:17 AM

H 16, Nr. 31228, was sold on November 11th, 1946, for 975 Francs with Switar 25-1.4 AR, Nr. 31031. The Yvar 75-2.8 AR, Nr. 34774, cost 252 Francs that day. Plus 4 % Umsatzsteuer, sales tax, but no luxury tax.

By the way, the first H model:
Posted Image
Note winding key on spring core

Soon it was changed like this:
Posted Image
Note point 20 on screw cap where the wind key still could be inserted, and the square dog of the wind crank

Greetings
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