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#1 Serge Teulon

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 06:42 AM

Hey,

The other day the eldest asked me when was slow motion first used in films....I thought that was an excellent question, to which I didn't know the answer.

Does anyone know?

Looking forward to finding out.....
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#2 Paul Bruening

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 07:56 AM

That could be very hard to determine. As I understand it, projectionists were sometimes given instructions from the movie makers as to how fast to crank the projectors during certain shots or scenes. I suspect that variable speed has been employed from the earliest times in movies.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:16 AM

There are slow-motion shots in Melies' movies at the turn of the century. Barry Salt in his book ("Film Style and Technology: History and Analysis") cites a slow-motion shot in a 1901 Hepworth Company movie and thinks there may be one in an 1899 R.W. Paul movie. Since early cameras were hand-cranked, slow-motion (and sped-up motion) effects started appearing very soon.
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#4 Serge Teulon

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 12:15 PM

Hey Paul and David,

Thanks for your answers.

That's interesting....just from the fact that the cameras were hand cranked makes it inevitable that film makers would've accidently stumbled upon over and under cranked effects.

That means that the projectionist had a massive role to play in the showing of the film. Get it right and it works, get it wrong and.....
Although I do wonder whether it's possible that the projectionist was told when to speed up and slow down due to the operator not being able to keep a constant speed on set...
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