Jump to content


Photo

Moving Starfield


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 chris descor

chris descor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 May 2009 - 07:52 AM

I was watching or re-watching David Lynch's The Straight Story and the end credits is comprised of a moving starfield and the titles/credits.
It is highly emotive for me anyway, and I recall he also used this in The Elephant Man.
Of course it has also been used in Star Wars and Star Trek.

So I wanted to know; How this was done, before the advent of computer generated effects that would be used for this purpose now days.
How was this done in 1999 and in 1980 etc analogue

I was thinking of experimenting with this and trying to create a moving starfield on my Super8 Nizo 801 or perhaps a 16mm or Super16 camera;
method basically;
using different cards/sheets of black acetate or film/lith or card poking very small holes in random areas but leaving the middle area black. or maybe black velvet with glitter lighten specifically.
then backlighting it, perhaps with a slightly random flickering light, lightbox, so that the stars 'glow' and shimmer like real stars.
then mounting the cards/sheets in front of the camera in a standard way/mount so that different layers later on can be fixed in the correct position.
then slowly zooming into/auto-zoom into the no-star center, making sure to fade-in from black at the start of the zoom.
Then rewinding the camera just a bit after the beginning of the first zoom, and now repeat the zoom fading from black into, but with a different variation of the stars card.
Perhaps each card would have 2-6 stars/holes so that there isnt always just one layer after another, but spread out randomly.
Any faults with this method?
could someone give advise?


I'd appreciate help/hints/info/guide/suggestions/comments etc]
Also any recommendations of films which used this beautiful effects and perhaps some of the first uses from the 20s or 30s etc hopefully non-sci-fi films
Thank you
  • 0

#2 Kip Kubin

Kip Kubin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 131 posts
  • Director

Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:10 AM

It's just multiple exposure.

Duvitine with holes cut out... back lit.. make a box so there's no spill.

Dolly or zoom in in a way that you can control speed.

Starts closer will move faster and be brighter.

Move the background and repeat.
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:44 AM

Black card with holes punched into it -- I use a drawing compass needle -- then put tracing paper over the back and backlight it.

For "2010" they did something unusual -- they flecked black paint dots on white paper and shot it on 65mm hi-con b&w stock and used the negative image as the positive in the optical printer.

Some people fleck white paint onto black card and shoot it on hi-con b&w stock as well. But in these two examples, we're talking about the stars being an element in optical printing -- if shooting onto camera color negative, they'd probably use the blacklit art method.
  • 0


Opal

Tai Audio

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

The Slider

Opal

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

CineTape