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Drag Me to Hell-Silver retention process?


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 11:16 PM

In our local entertainment section of the paper, there was a shot of Alison Lohman in what looked like a grave and the shot looked like it used the silver retention process, but I didn't see that in the trailer so I was just curious if anyone knew if Raimi used this process in certain portions of the film? (I haven't seen it yet BTW)
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#2 David Desio

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 08:49 AM

Don't know about the technical aspect of the film but I saw this last friday and I thought it was great. Very fun, old evil dead Raimi style film. I was laughing while I was being scared. It was just an all around good time and fun horror flick. It didn't rely on twists and gimmicks, no scooby-doo ending where the bad guy is really and ex-lover who was killed on the side of the raod by the Protagonists sister in-law who has become estranged and put in a mental hospital only to have no record of her ever being there...etc.

The story was just good old fashioned linear horror.
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 08:30 PM

In our local entertainment section of the paper, there was a shot of Alison Lohman in what looked like a grave and the shot looked like it used the silver retention process, but I didn't see that in the trailer so I was just curious if anyone knew if Raimi used this process in certain portions of the film? (I haven't seen it yet BTW)

I believe they attempted to replicate the OZ process in the DI. There was an article about it in AC or ICG.
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 12:26 AM

"Oz Process", That's a new one on me. Can you elaborate? :huh:
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 05:20 AM

I can't look for the article right now, and I'm probably not the best to explain it anyway. Hopefully someone will chime in with more info. I looked for a quick link through google but didn't find anything immediately.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 10:47 AM

I can't look for the article right now, and I'm probably not the best to explain it anyway. Hopefully someone will chime in with more info. I looked for a quick link through google but didn't find anything immediately.

possible, but slightly lighter than a full skip-bleach. Like ENR (or Deluxe's ACE process) it only works for prints because it involves added b&w tanks to the FCP print processing line, so basically you are permanently developing in some silver into the print.

The amount of silver left in the print is measured in the amount of IR absorption -- I think the highest ENR level is 100 IR (mistakenly called 100% ENR), skip-bleach is something like 320 IR, so OZ and CCE is something in between, like 250 IR. I think.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 10:50 AM

OZ is a variation on the ENR process, but allowing a heavier level of silver to be left in, closer to the max level of a skip-bleach process. OZ is similar to Deluxe's CCE process.

Like ENR (or Deluxe's ACE process) it only works for prints because it involves added b&w tanks to the FCP print processing line, so basically you are permanently developing in some silver into the print.

The amount of silver left in the print is measured in the amount of IR absorption -- I think the highest ENR level is 100 IR (mistakenly called 100% ENR), skip-bleach is something like 320 IR, so OZ and CCE is something in between, like 250 IR. I think.

Difference is that ENR (or ACE) is variable in strength, you can order it in degrees less than 100 IR.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 11:33 AM

See: "American Gangster", shot by Savides
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