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Filter setting for indoors/outdoors?


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#1 Cahit Tomruk

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 01:44 PM

I have a nizo s56 and the seller told me that for outdoors i should set the switch in the 'lightbulb' position and use a blue filter for indoors.
is this information correct?
thanks
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#2 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 02:51 PM

forgive me if you already know this, but using color correction filters (blue, orange, etc) is for when your lights don't match the type of film you are using. the advice of always using a blue filter indoors probably assumes that you always use "D" (daylight) film. if so, this rule of thumb will generally get you acceptable results.

the good news is that film is pretty forgiving and the lab can correct a lot of stuff for you - the rest you can usually fix on the computer. but if you want the best results, it's a good idea to read about color temperature. here's a decent article that shows you what type of filter to use under various types of lights:
http://www.ephotozin...emperature-4804

have fun with your nizo!

I have a nizo s56 and the seller told me that for outdoors i should set the switch in the 'lightbulb' position and use a blue filter for indoors.
is this information correct?
thanks


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#3 Cahit Tomruk

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 03:17 PM

forgive me if you already know this, but using color correction filters (blue, orange, etc) is for when your lights don't match the type of film you are using. the advice of always using a blue filter indoors probably assumes that you always use "D" (daylight) film. if so, this rule of thumb will generally get you acceptable results.

the good news is that film is pretty forgiving and the lab can correct a lot of stuff for you - the rest you can usually fix on the computer. but if you want the best results, it's a good idea to read about color temperature. here's a decent article that shows you what type of filter to use under various types of lights:
http://www.ephotozin...emperature-4804

have fun with your nizo!


I am using the standard ektachrome 64T.
When I shoot outside I keep it at lightbulb position and for indoors I need a filter, right?
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 04:03 PM

(Agent),

Go to My Controls and change your screen name to your real name per this forum's rules.
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#5 Cahit Tomruk

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 04:32 PM

Ok, from the info I found, ektachrome 64T is tungsten so for daylight I need the built in orange filter.
They guy who sold me the camera told me to not use it, and confused me a bit

Edited by Cahit Tumruk, 06 June 2009 - 04:32 PM.

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#6 Tom Jensen

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 05:58 PM

Ok, from the info I found, ektachrome 64T is tungsten so for daylight I need the built in orange filter.
They guy who sold me the camera told me to not use it, and confused me a bit


The film is tungsten balanced. It is used under tungsten light, usually indoors. When you take it outside where the light is bluer, you need an orange filter to make it less blue and bring it back to normal. When shooting indoors, the filter should be out of the way which is the "lightbulb" position. When you shoot outdoors, you put it in the "sun" position. If you use daylight balanced film shoot outdoors only. Put the filter in the tungsten position so there is no filter in the way. You don't have to use the filter in the way for either film if you have it transferred to videotape because you can color correct it in the transfer if the lab has the capability to color correct. Super 8 cameras were designed for the standard Tungsten balanced films.

Edited by Tom Jensen, 06 June 2009 - 06:00 PM.

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#7 Jim Carlile

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 02:18 AM

The guy who sold you the camera told you wrong.

Do the exact opposite. In daylight, slide the switch away from bulb. This puts the 85 filter in the path for this film.

The film is made for artificial light, so you need the filter outdoors. The bulb setting means artificial light-- indoors, in other words.
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