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#1 Jesse Lee Cairnie

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 06:18 PM

I am looking to do some research and tests to learn more on the workflow of the D21.

I was wondering if anyone might be able to post a link to an ARRIRAW file from footage they have (If thats even possible). a quick 30 sec would be perfect, just to have something to work with. I have everything I need except the footage.

Thank you.
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 08:03 PM

You assume that 'whatever' they shot as a 'test' or otherwise... is actually 'definitive'..:rolleyes: Only your own tests will tell you what 'you' will be able to achieve with any system... Panavision, Arri or otherwise......
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#3 Jesse Lee Cairnie

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 03:50 PM

I hear that! hahaa.. I was thinking of just the ARRIRAW file itself.. the process of dealing with the information.. this is a non creative purely technical "test" of the workflow and process..

Cheers!

Edited by Jesse Cairnie, 13 June 2009 - 03:53 PM.

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#4 Brendan OReilly

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 09:08 AM

I hear that! hahaa.. I was thinking of just the ARRIRAW file itself.. the process of dealing with the information.. this is a non creative purely technical "test" of the workflow and process..

Cheers!


Hi there,

Feel free to contact www.arricsc.com for answers to your questions.
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#5 Samuel Stewart

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:04 AM

Hey man,
I was wondering, I know that some cameras have physical shutters and others don't. The D 21 does, and I know this helps eliminate the rolling shutter issue you get but is this the secret to getting closer to film look with a digital sensor in capturing images. I have always understood from most video that the nostalgic feel you get comes from the 3-dimensional characteristic of film grain but I have also heard frame rate is among others that help get you closer to it, but D-21 gets so close to "the look" or feel that I wonder if the shutter is a major step in getting that overall film feel? Any feed back s greatly appreciated thanks!
Samuel Stewart
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#6 Vincent Biron

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 02:39 PM

Well, if I may intervene...

I'm no expert on the matter, but it seems to me that shutter speed/type makes a big difference in the final look of an image, but is often disregarded by some cinematographers. The D-21 and Alexa seem to have less of that Red-typical digital edge, and I really think this is due to the rolling shutter being more apparent on a camera that has no physical shutter to block the light while the sensor is refreshing....

Like I said, I'm not a engineer type guy, so those are my two cents... I'd be happy to read a reply by someone more "informed" on the shutter intricacies.

Cheers,
Vincent

Hey man,
I was wondering, I know that some cameras have physical shutters and others don't. The D 21 does, and I know this helps eliminate the rolling shutter issue you get but is this the secret to getting closer to film look with a digital sensor in capturing images. I have always understood from most video that the nostalgic feel you get comes from the 3-dimensional characteristic of film grain but I have also heard frame rate is among others that help get you closer to it, but D-21 gets so close to "the look" or feel that I wonder if the shutter is a major step in getting that overall film feel? Any feed back s greatly appreciated thanks!
Samuel Stewart


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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:03 PM

The rolling shutter problem is purely a matter of how fast they can read out and clear the photosites. The mechanical shutters of film cameras are also "rolling". It's just that they go fast enough to not be a problem. Inch and watch, you'll see it takes the shutter edge perhaps 45 to 60 degrees to transit over the whole frame. The first electronic rolling shutters were always reading out, taking the whole 360 degrees to transit from top to bottom.

The other slight difference is that film shutters go by at an angle, and at some distance from the focal plane, so their edges won't look exactly like the pixel bounadry sharp horizontal edge of an electronic camera. But you can catch the film shutter with strobe lights sometimes.





-- J.S.
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