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Film speed and shutter setting: Kodak 7222


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#1 Robert Lewis

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 03:37 PM

I have a couple of 100ft rolls of Kodak 7222 negative 16mm film which I wish to use.

My camera is a Bolex H16 Rex4 with Kern Vario 18-86 lens. The film speed for daylight use is 250 ASA, but the lens exposure setting will only go to 200 ASA.

I understand that I can overcome this difficulty by stepping down the camera's shutter. Can anybody advise whether one notch on the shutter control lever (which I think is one-third of a stop) is the correct adjustment?

I would be most grateful for any advice on the point.
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 04:27 PM

Doesn't the reflex eat a third of a stop anyway? Sounds to me like your problem is solved. . .

Just remember to always err on the side of overexposure and you'll be find. Never underexpose and don't go crazy with overexposure (like +3 stops).
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#3 Robert Lewis

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 02:37 AM

Doesn't the reflex eat a third of a stop anyway? Sounds to me like your problem is solved. . .

Just remember to always err on the side of overexposure and you'll be find. Never underexpose and don't go crazy with overexposure (like +3 stops).


Thanks Karl.

I double checked what I said in my earlier message, and, of course, I was wrong. One step on the shutter control lever is half a stop and not one third.

In the past I have found the exposure control to be very good, so if the prism does absorb one third of a stop I hadn't noticed it.

It was suggested to me that 50 ASA (250 ASA rated film when the highest rating the lens exposure system will allow is 200 ASA) can be corrected by setting the shutter one notch down thus reducing the exposure by half a stop.

I guess I should just try that and see.
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#4 David Auner aac

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 03:50 AM

In the past I have found the exposure control to be very good, so if the prism does absorb one third of a stop I hadn't noticed it.


I'd say that since that lens was built for RX Bolexes it's meter is by design compensated for the prism light loss. When you expose 250 film at 200 you're actually overexposing by one third of a stop, something that is generally good for negative anyways. I'd just go ahead and shoot, setting your meter to 200 ISO.

Cheers, Dave
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