Jump to content


Photo

Newbie Lighting Help


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Magdalenski

Chris Magdalenski

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Atlanta, GA

Posted 20 June 2009 - 12:38 PM

Hi Everyone,

Was wondering if someone could help me out...

Basically, I'm a first time DP working on 30 minute short film to be shot on Panasonic DVX100B. My lighting kid contains 2 Arri 650s, 2 Arri 1ks, 1 Lowell 750 Total, and 1 Lowell 500.

There may also be money in the budget to rent a couple of 2Ks, or even a 5K, but I'm not sure if that can happen yet.

One of the scenes in the film is shot in a restaurant, and consists of six people sitting around a table having a tense conversation. The room's existing light varies depending on the time of day, (I've attached a couple of photos to show).

My idea was to go for a more natural light look, since I don't have a lot of lights (or time) at my disposal and it would be in keeping my plan for the overall look of the film.

I've also attached a prelim lighting diagram (with possible camera angles marked) -

I just wanted some opinions as to if I'm on the right track with my thinking.

Please forgive the small size of the images. I had to res down to fit.

Chris

Attached Images

  • RMviews.gif
  • lightingPlan1.gif

  • 0

#2 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 20 June 2009 - 01:47 PM

You aren't going to get anything out of those Lamps with Full CTB on them... even 2ks & 5ks... better off putting Full CTO on the windows (my preference).. or renting some smaller (1200) HMI Pars.
  • 0

#3 jeff woods

jeff woods
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Other
  • Portland, OR

Posted 20 June 2009 - 02:32 PM

It looks like you have a huge bounce hanging over the entire space; utilize that to bring up the ambient light while still maintaining the "natural" look.

And I'd second the suggestion of CTOing the windows; with all that tungsten in your kit, and what's probably available as practicals in the space, you'd be beating yourself up to try and get most of it daylight balanced.

-j
  • 0

#4 Chris Magdalenski

Chris Magdalenski

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Atlanta, GA

Posted 21 June 2009 - 05:52 PM

Thanks for your help guys! CTO-ing the windows does make more sense.
  • 0

#5 David Desio

David Desio
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 204 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • california, USA

Posted 24 June 2009 - 03:23 PM

Thanks for your help guys! CTO-ing the windows does make more sense.




A little late but...if those windows are pretty big, it look like they are; could you spin the table 90 degrees so that the actors would never be backlit by it, instead it would be more side-y? It may give everyone a chance to get hit by the strong light coming through the window. What time of day are you shooting?
  • 0

#6 Chris Magdalenski

Chris Magdalenski

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Atlanta, GA

Posted 26 June 2009 - 05:59 PM

A little late but...if those windows are pretty big, it look like they are; could you spin the table 90 degrees so that the actors would never be backlit by it, instead it would be more side-y? It may give everyone a chance to get hit by the strong light coming through the window. What time of day are you shooting?




Hmmm... That's a thought too... Not sure, because this scene will probably take at least one full day to shoot, and I'm afraid that the light will change in there pretty dramatically between morning and afternoon. I might have to try to get back there and get some still shots at different times of the day to see how different it will look. In the script, the scene is supposed to take place in the morning - probably around 9am.
  • 0

#7 David Desio

David Desio
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 204 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • california, USA

Posted 29 June 2009 - 11:10 AM

Hmmm... That's a thought too... Not sure, because this scene will probably take at least one full day to shoot, and I'm afraid that the light will change in there pretty dramatically between morning and afternoon. I might have to try to get back there and get some still shots at different times of the day to see how different it will look. In the script, the scene is supposed to take place in the morning - probably around 9am.



If it were me I would let the windows blow out unless you need to see outside, spin the table 90 degrees and shoot any shots that you will see the window first, then go in for the coverage being careful to try and match color temps of daylight coming in and your lights. Or better yet, do the CTO thing on the window and not worry much about the lights being as tungsten.

Of course with the CTO you may not be able to blow the windows out...many options, which one will serve the scene and the time constraints best?

Edited by David Desio, 29 June 2009 - 11:11 AM.

  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

CineLab

CineTape

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Opal

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape