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Canon 5DMKII Slow Motion


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#1 Seth Mondragon

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 01:47 AM

Hi everybody, I'm starting to do more wedding video work with the 5DMKII. I don't want to use much slow motion, if any, but I'm sure the need will arise at some point. Has anybody been able to slow down the footage of the 5DMKII and get acceptable results? If so, what program are you using? Also, does it have anything to do with the shutter speed of the footage I'm trying to slow down? Thanks for your help!

-seth
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#2 Thomas Dobbie

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 05:15 PM

Hi,

I haven't tried it personally,but several editors have recommended Twixtor,perhaps worth checking it out.
http://www.revisionf...oducts/twixtor/

Regards
Tom
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#3 Tom Lowe

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 07:18 PM

Another option, similar to twixtor, would be the pixel-motion frame interpolation "timewarp" effect with After Effects. Haven't tried it with 5D2 footage yet. It really depends on what the footage is, too. Some types of footage are easier to interpolate than others.
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#4 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 08:35 PM

Retiming can sometimes help out in a pinch, but only to a limited degree, and only if you know how to properly apply it. Retimers that use optical flow, such as Twixtor or Kronos, analyze the movement of each pixel in each frame in order to determine its motion, then use that to create entirely new frames. But if you've got things that cross each other, or things that move in different ways at the same time, they don't know how to interpret that, so you end up getting a weird, unpleasant warpy result. The only way to avoid this is to roto each element separately, feed then in one-by-one, and composite the results. This can work, but it's quite a lot of manual effort, and there really isn't any way around it.

The other thing is that you're limited by what was shot. Let's say you want to make the bouquet toss slow motion. If it was thrown pretty fast, and it's only on screen for 3 frames once it starts moving, then that's the only input you have, and it's not much. Even if you separate it out by rotoscoping it, you're probably just going to get a blurry streak that moves incongruously slow, because that's all the program can see.
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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 12:18 PM

We've tried Twixtor, it's not ready for prime time. Arri, ironically, has a much better solution that makes this competitior's camera far more viable:

http://www.arri.de/d...relativity.html

FotoKem has it here in LA.




-- J.S.
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