Jump to content


Photo

How to get a larger portfolio


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Lance Tang

Lance Tang
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 June 2009 - 08:14 PM

Currently I'm a student studying film, but I don't have the resources to shoot movies. What are some steps I can take, preferably with a cheaper video camera, to start getting some shorts in my repertoire?
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 26 June 2009 - 05:35 AM

Just shoot things.
They don't necessarily need to be a full film; you could just go out and grab some nice shots here and there. And steadily keep working with other students on their films. Shoot and shoot and shoot.
Does the school have any equipment? My school had a very nice equipment office in terms of camera selection and so long as we were in production classes we could take them out and work with them.
  • 0

#3 Lance Tang

Lance Tang
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 June 2009 - 08:58 AM

Just shoot things.
They don't necessarily need to be a full film; you could just go out and grab some nice shots here and there. And steadily keep working with other students on their films. Shoot and shoot and shoot.
Does the school have any equipment? My school had a very nice equipment office in terms of camera selection and so long as we were in production classes we could take them out and work with them.


The school does have cameras for rental but I'm in the lower division classes so I'm not sure I can go and use them. I'm also not quite sure how good the cameras are either.

Should I perhaps buy my own starter video camera? Any recommendations for that?
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:06 AM

You could buy your own camera, but at this early stage I'd recommend against it. See if you can take out some of the starter cameras @ school tool 'round with them for awhile and perhaps start a "camera fund," saving up money to get a good all 'round pro/semi-pro camera when/if you decide that's what you want.
Talk with the students in the upper echelon classes, and and Teaching Aids (TAs) you may have about the camera policy at your school and see if you can shadow them on their shoots, network like mad with the people around you and get on as many sets as possible. Work on pro shoots when they come along to build up your resume and relationships, for the students find out who has borrowed the camera and offer to work with them/shoot for them just to get some trigger time. And at all costs avoid dropping the cash for a camera until you are SURE that you're ready. In the end, once you price out a full amount of bits and bobs [tripod/lights/audio/editing] you'll see why it's best to wait...
  • 0

#5 Lance Tang

Lance Tang
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 June 2009 - 10:03 AM

In high school I had shot a few award winning films (small competitions), but the camera I used was simply a low-quality camera, and looking back at the films, they aren't that great in my opinion. Should I put those in my portfolio?
  • 0

#6 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 26 June 2009 - 10:05 AM

Depends what you want to do. If you want to direct then each project helps. I would include them now in the beginning and phase them out as you get better stuff. We've all been there before, with our early "worser" films in our early reels etc phased out as we get better things (i'm on the verge of cutting multiple reels as opposed to just a montage right now, for example)
  • 0

#7 Steve McBride

Steve McBride
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 239 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • New York, NY

Posted 27 June 2009 - 02:01 PM

Just go out and shoot. Contact local ad agencies and see if they have gear that you can rent. The last project I shot was just an improv comedy with a couple friends and I talked to an ad agency (granted I had done work with them in the past) and was able to get a DVX100 and fluid head tripod for $65 a day.

If you want to be a DP, don't worry about lighting at first. Work on your framing and movement in the frame. Then as you learn more start using some basic three point lighting and eventually you'll be able to light full sets and make everything look beautiful :) .
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery