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Contrast viewing lens to check lighting?


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#1 Kavanjit Singh

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 01:10 PM

Hi - I have seen some camera assistants checking the lighting contrast using some lens. Its looks like a magnification lens but when you look through it, it tells you how exactly the contrast between dark and bright will look in film.

Can anyone tell me whats it called?

Thanks
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 03:38 PM

Contrast/Pan/Gaffer's Glass
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#3 Kavanjit Singh

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 03:07 PM

Contrast/Pan/Gaffer's Glass


Thanks. That is some post.

I checked the links in that post and found out 2 types of contrast glass for color from tiffen.

#2 viewer is for film speeds to 100;
#3 is for faster film. They can be used for video, as well, with the #3 being better suited for lower light levels.

I am a direction student so got confused in this. I know we used film of speed 160T for our super 16mm exercises. Shall I go for #3 glass type

Thanks
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 04:04 PM

Contrast Glasses (should) come with both densities. If not, order both as you will need them. If you are going to Gaff or DP a Gaffer's Glass can be very useful as well.
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 04:49 PM

p.s.... Regarding a Contrast Glass, you need both densities of glass because it is not as much related to the asa you are using as much as the amount of Light you are viewing. Example.. say you are shooting 500t outside in bright daylight, well, that lower asa density glass (lighter glass) will do you little good... or imagine lighting 200t for High Speed photography.. you would want to use the darker grade of glass to view Contrast because you will most likely be dealing with high light levels.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 05:55 PM

Learn something new every day.


I thought these filters went out with B&W TV. They were, I recall, used quite extensively to make sure color shows would photograph acceptably for B&W viewers too.
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