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Shooting Vision 200T in daylight with Nizo 801


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#1 Jon Rat

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 04:39 AM

Hi all,

I'm going to shoot V200T in daylight on my Nizo 801, I know from reading other posts that the camera will read it as 100 iso (but 1 stop OEX is okay by Kodak) and that because the cartridge isnt notched the 85 filter won't be engaged. So I could make a notch myself thus engaging the filter thereby getting the camera to rate at 160 iso with correct filtration (correct me if I'm wrong).

Am I right in thinking that the cartridge both tells the camera the iso and whether to engage the filter or not? if so what does the bulb/ sun knob do? surely this engages or disengages the filter?, I've heard mention that I can achieve the 160 iso just by swithching the knob to 'bulb' on these Nizos, does this switch overide what the cartridge is telling the camera? I'm confused.

Any feedback is much appreciated,

Cheers, Jon Ratigan (Wales)
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 10:45 AM

Hi all,

I'm going to shoot V200T in daylight on my Nizo 801, I know from reading other posts that the camera will read it as 100 iso (but 1 stop OEX is okay by Kodak) and that because the cartridge isnt notched the 85 filter won't be engaged. So I could make a notch myself thus engaging the filter thereby getting the camera to rate at 160 iso with correct filtration (correct me if I'm wrong).

Am I right in thinking that the cartridge both tells the camera the iso and whether to engage the filter or not? if so what does the bulb/ sun knob do? surely this engages or disengages the filter?, I've heard mention that I can achieve the 160 iso just by swithching the knob to 'bulb' on these Nizos, does this switch overide what the cartridge is telling the camera? I'm confused.

Any feedback is much appreciated,

Cheers, Jon Ratigan (Wales)


I've shot Vision 200T outdoors with no filter and been very happy with the results, especially in contrasty situations in which tree foilage breaks ups the lighting with shadows. I suppose there is the danger that your camera f-stop may end up around F-16 to f-22 if it is a bright sunny day and you are shooting in an open space.

Ultra high f-stop shooting can sometimes produce spotty results simply because the camera lens is iris'd down so much. In these situations, I recommend a faster shutter speed if you have that option on the camera. The Canon 814 and 1014XLS have the "sun" setting which reduces the shutter angle from 220 degrees to 150, which is something I would recommend when shooting 200T. However, sometimes the smaller shutter angle can create flicker, especially at the 24FPS setting. This happened to me with one of my Canon's. However, it wasn't horribly bad flicker and ironically actually worked for the scene.

When I shot with Vision 200 with trees overhead creating intermittent shadow areas, I was able to shoot around an f5.6/f8.0, but I was also shooting at 36 frames per second slow motion.

If you are comfortable using a filter that may be your best bet, either an ND-1 stop filter or an 85ND filter.
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#3 Jon Rat

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 04:04 AM

Thanks for the reply,

Correct me if I'm wrong but I've come to the conclusion that the cartridge notch is a kind of safety thing that tells the camera to allow the use of the 85 filter but until you engage the filter on the bulb/sun dial it does not slide into place.

So I think my options are:

Just insert the Vision 2 200T cartridge without notch- camera reads as 100 iso (daylight), presumably if you then engage the filter it loses an extra 2/3 stop?

Cut my own notches, camera reads as 160, if I engage filter this becomes 100 equivalent but correct for daylight.

I could cut notches and not engage filter, camera would read as 160 and I would correct in post,

I would really appreciate verification on all this,

cheers all,

Jon Ratigan
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 02:36 AM

On the 801, V200T is read as ASA 100 because of the notchless daylight cartridge-- it triggers the camera to read the film-speed indice as 100 and also retracts the internal 85 filter.

That's the daylight setting for this particular indice. Nizo owners say that you can override this by toggling the switch back to 'tungsten' to get a 160 reading. I can't verify this-- it's an unusual feature that circumvents the SMPTE super 8 speed-indice protocol.

What I would do is cut a notch, then slide the filter switch to daylight. This way you get the benefit of the 85 filter in place for daylight use-- remember, it's a tungsten film. But no matter where you set the switch, the film speed will still be rated at ASA 160 in this camera with a notched cartridge-- but the filter will soak up about 2/3 stop of light, thus giving you an effective film speed of 100. That's where the 100 comes from.

What Kodak does is speed-notch the film for ASA 160T/100D, then uses a notchless cartridge to set the meter to 100. The film is rated at 200, but they prefer it overexposed a bit, and for daylight use, they figure you will use an external 85 filter over the lens anyway. When used this Kodak way, the film is STILL being exposed at ASA 100 and it will still be overexposed one stop, even with an external filter.

Overexposure with negative film is great-- preferable, in fact, because it causes the basic exposure to sit well over on the H + D curve, thus giving you great detail in your shadowier areas.
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