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Is the viewfinder, the reflex or the gate askew?


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#1 Ryan Andrzejewski

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 11:28 PM

Ok, my H16 Rex was a purchase of hobby. From Ebay, no doubt, and it came stripped and well used. I'd like to keep a 16mm for hobby and short-film making. However, I'm not completely sold on this Bolex now that I've held it in my hands. There are plenty of posts stating that Arri is the better choice. I'd welcome any feedback on that, and I'm sure there is plenty available through search. Reply if you are passionate either way.

I'd rather not spend the $500-$1000 on a full tear down and rebuild of this Bolex camera if, indeed, it will cost that much. When I look through the viewfinder, the rectangle image I see is slightly askew or crooked. It is enough to cause concern. My question is this, How do I know if that is going to screw up every frame of film I run through the camera? Is it the viewfinder, the reflex mechanism, or the actual gate that is causing this? Again, I'm brainstorming here because I don't care to pay for shipping it to a proper repairman and then have it cost my son's tuition to repair it. And there are bound to be replies stating I should just get some film, run it through and see what happens. Anyone have some 16mm laying around that I could burn? I'm just trying not to make silly decisions from the get-go on this film hobby. Thanks for reading.
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#2 Glenn Brady

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 07:19 AM

There's a small mask in the viewfinder that frames the image transmitted by the prism. These can sometimes be knocked askew. If that's the case, it's a simple matter of opening up the reflex viewfinder (four small screws secure the cover on those that I've examined) and reorienting the mask. It may be necessary to remove the entire viewfinder assembly; it's secured by four screws also.
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#3 Ryan Andrzejewski

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 03:19 PM

There's a small mask in the viewfinder that frames the image transmitted by the prism. These can sometimes be knocked askew. If that's the case, it's a simple matter of opening up the reflex viewfinder (four small screws secure the cover on those that I've examined) and reorienting the mask. It may be necessary to remove the entire viewfinder assembly; it's secured by four screws also.


That was the trick, Glenn, well done! Thank you for an easy fix.
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#4 Lucky Cheng

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:49 PM

I have a similar problem--I've got a REX-5 where the image in the finder extends outside the bounds. How can I correct this--is there an easy way for me to adjust it from where I can reach the prism through the turret, or is this better left for the shop?

 

Thanks,
Lucky


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#5 Richard Jura

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 07:05 AM

I don't fully understand the question, the mask in the Bolex is smaller than the actual aperture so you're always getting more than you see.

Maybe the last mask which is in the eyepiece is missing.

 

Rich


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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:48 PM

Yes, hard to understand exactly - what 'image' extends outside of what bounds ?


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