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#1 Tyler Leisher

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 10:38 PM

Hi,

So I've never worked in camera before, I've spent four years working as a Set PA and Im ready to make the jump to camera... looking to start at the base with being either a loader or loader/2nd.. but I've never loaded film (or really dealt with it, even the TV shows that I worked on were shot digitally).

I'm wondering two things:

1) Is it still a wise choice to learn to work with Film? (Might seem like a stupid question, but with so many TV shows and indie films going digital, would I be better off to learn the digital formats more fully and learn film as an interest/hobby?)

2) Where can I get experience loading film, without getting a job as a loader? Should I apply for jobs as a loader, and the 2nd will show me how to do it the first time?
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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 01:47 AM

1) Is it still a wise choice to learn to work with Film?

Yes, learn it as fast as possible. You can't get away with not knowing film if you plan to be an AC. If you're jumping straight into shooting, then you can hire ACs to load and thread the camera for you. You should still know film workflow and how to expose but you can probably get away with not knowing how to remove a ground glass or oil the movement, etc.

2) Where can I get experience loading film, without getting a job as a loader?

Your profile says you're a student. Are you attending a film school right now? Or if not, do you know anybody attending film school? Try to get on a student production, let them know you've never loaded before but are very interested and willing to learn. You'll have to do if for free for a while until you feel confident that you know what you're doing. Then start looking for paid gigs as a loader. Also, once you've got the hang of things, start going to your local rental houses, introduce yourself as a loader and ask them to show you how to load their various magazines. They may recommend you for jobs coming thru if they like you.
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#3 Tyler Leisher

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:10 PM

Yes, learn it as fast as possible. You can't get away with not knowing film if you plan to be an AC. If you're jumping straight into shooting, then you can hire ACs to load and thread the camera for you. You should still know film workflow and how to expose but you can probably get away with not knowing how to remove a ground glass or oil the movement, etc.


Your profile says you're a student. Are you attending a film school right now? Or if not, do you know anybody attending film school? Try to get on a student production, let them know you've never loaded before but are very interested and willing to learn. You'll have to do if for free for a while until you feel confident that you know what you're doing. Then start looking for paid gigs as a loader. Also, once you've got the hang of things, start going to your local rental houses, introduce yourself as a loader and ask them to show you how to load their various magazines. They may recommend you for jobs coming thru if they like you.


I was a student, not in film but I'm thinking of attending the UCLA Extension program for their Cinematography certificate.

Would it be a good idea to maybe buy a 400' mag of film (From what I understand, it costs around $80-160 for it) and practice loading that?
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:32 PM

No, learn with junk film, which is free. . .
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#5 Tom Jensen

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 11:10 PM

No, if you learn how to load film you might have to do it. Learn how to do what it is you want to do.
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#6 Satyani Adiwibowo

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 10:22 AM

From my experience, the best way to learn about loading magazine are become apprentice or follow the DP as an apprentice. I know some feature film will accept apprentice as part of the crew, and you got paid for that.

The second one, jump from one tho another rental house. You've been in film business, so you must know some of the camera rental. Go there, don't hesitate to ask.

I've never been in film school, and never be in film business like u. But by doing two things I've mentioned above, now I'm a film loader, and 2nd camera assistant if the Production House wants to use digital camera.

Good luck then. :lol:

PS: I'm interested about the film magazine, where did u buy it anyway?

Regards,
Satyani A.
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#7 Luc Allein

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 12:32 AM

Hang out at Panavision, they'll let you practice loading in the dark room.

Good luck trying to get into loader, it's harder and harder these days. Ive been trying for 3 **(obscenity removed)**in years and still havent gotten any real/steady work.

Learn digital before it's too late, in addition to film.
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#8 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 10:47 PM

I got a film camera... it's old but amazing... It's a 16mm film cam. If your around some time I'll let you give it a try. It's best if you study it first and learn about different Emulsions. It really helps out a lot. 16mm isn't dead. I need another job, any PA jobs guys?
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#9 James Daly

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 07:03 PM

I worked as a prep for Arri in NYC for a couple years, did a LOT of awful bitchwork, got paid next to nothing, practically gave my life to the job. Came out knowing EVERYTHING about the equipment, and more importantly, every ac in the city. Give a rental house job a shot. It's an enormous sacrifice, but if you really want to work in camera, it's a great way to do it.
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#10 Tom Jensen

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:55 PM

I worked as a prep for Arri in NYC for a couple years, did a LOT of awful bitchwork, got paid next to nothing, practically gave my life to the job. Came out knowing EVERYTHING about the equipment, and more importantly, every ac in the city. Give a rental house job a shot. It's an enormous sacrifice, but if you really want to work in camera, it's a great way to do it.


I did the same thing at Otto Nemenz in LA. I remember when I was checking in equipment I always wondered why the AC's just shoved stuff into any case and sent it back. Then after working on an 18 hour video and wrapping as the sun was rising I figured out why.
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#11 Josiah Staggers

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 11:50 AM

I did the same thing at Otto Nemenz in LA. I remember when I was checking in equipment I always wondered why the AC's just shoved stuff into any case and sent it back. Then after working on an 18 hour video and wrapping as the sun was rising I figured out why.


Hey Tom, how did you go about getting the position at Otto Nemenz. Did you simply hear about an opening and apply for it?
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#12 David Bradley

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:32 AM

Go to Arri or Panavision and ask crew support if you can practice with a camera. Its that easy. You'll probably meet people there who are regularly in work so it may even lead to a gig if you're lucky.
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