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The Hurt Locker


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#1 KayvanGabbay

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 04:08 PM

What camera was The Hurt Locker shot with? The only thing I know is that it was shot with four handheld cameras.

Thanks all.
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#2 Richard Vialet

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 04:26 PM

According to American Cinematographer:

It was shot on Super16mm with Aaton XTR-Prods and A-Minimas and Canon zoom lenses, with Fuji 250D 8663 and 500T 8673 film and the Phantom HD camera for the great high-speed material.
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#3 Steve McBride

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 11:18 PM

Just to add to Richard's post,

http://www.imdb.com/...87912/technical
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#4 Howard Phillips

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:30 AM

According to American Cinematographer:

It was shot on Super16mm with Aaton XTR-Prods and A-Minimas and Canon zoom lenses, with Fuji 250D 8663 and 500T 8673 film and the Phantom HD camera for the great high-speed material.


This beautifully shot film is a great example of using the right tools for a director's vision:besides their world-wide use in documentary (and narrative)-style filmmaking, the Aaton cameras create an umatched level of registration and 'micro-registration', which ads a further level of image definition, or 'crispness' - and THE HURT LOCKER's imagery really demonstrates this. In fact the switches between digital-originated images from the Phantom, which are usually completely 'grain free' (noise free) and the sometimes very grainy S16mm filmstock again show how seamless and beautifully the Aaton cameras capture images.
For those of you not famliar with the cameras, check out the Aaton or Abel Cine sites; of really special note is the fact that the A-Minima desn't even have a rear pressure-plaate, and yet still captures and delivers such perfectly registered footage!
THE HURT LOCKER is an excellent opportunity to see a finely-made war movie and some really beautiful cinematography.

http://www.aaton.com/
http://www.abelcine.com/store/home.php

Disclaimer: I don't work for Aaton, just admire the excellence of their cameras! : )
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 01:32 AM

Saw it, and enjoyed the camera work very much. My only comment is regarding the Phantom high speed footage. Was it just me, or was there a hint of chromatic aberration in the image? The shot of the ground shaking during an explosion seemed to have that purplish-blue tinge around the edge detail of the shadows, also making it appear quite soft. Noticed the same in the other shot of the bullet shell hitting the floor, only it wasn't nearly as bad.

I suppose it might have been caused by the blowup to 35, but I was curious what you guys thought.
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#6 David Auner aac

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 02:24 AM

The shot of the ground shaking during an explosion seemed to have that purplish-blue tinge around the edge detail of the shadows, also making it appear quite soft. Noticed the same in the other shot of the bullet shell hitting the floor, only it wasn't nearly as bad.


Hi Jonathan,

did you see a purple edge only? No corresponding yellow edge not he opposite side of the detail? And did occur on edges with large differences in brightness? If it was blue only and on highlight edges only it could have been purple fringing, a type of CA known as axial chromatic aberration. Wiki on purple fringing. This stuff drove me crazy when I shot with DSLR with CCDs. It is very much better with CMOS chips. Read the wiki entry to learn why people think so.

Cheers, Dave
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#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 12:15 PM

did you see a purple edge only? No corresponding yellow edge not he opposite side of the detail? And did occur on edges with large differences in brightness? If it was blue only and on highlight edges only it could have been purple fringing, a type of CA known as axial chromatic aberration.


There may have been yellow as well, I only had 3 to 4 seconds to analyze the shot. Check it out for yourself, I'd like to know what you think :)
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#8 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 05:10 PM

Posted Image

Look at the edges of the sand on the ground. There is some green/orangish edges. I noticed this in the theater as well.

Posted Image
Same thing on the top right, where the rust is being shooken off the car.

Posted Image

Same shot, more apparent. This was noticeable in the theater.

Posted Image

This shoot looked much cleaner, but a lot higher in terms of contrast. Could the contrast be hiding the aforementioned problems?
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 12:35 AM

Thanks Jamie!

Yeah, I'm just curious how much of it is from the Phantom, and how much of it is a result of the lens choice.
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#10 Mitch Gross

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 03:54 PM

This would not be in the original RAW files. It is possible that it is an issue with the debayering process, as there are any number of ways to do this work incorrectly. They may have even taken the HD-SDI right out of the camera and recorded this to a deck. Usually fine for video finish, but not for a DI.
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#11 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 07:56 AM

Loved the film and cinematography.
Suited the story perfectly.

I noticed the unusual green dots on the still in AC mag as well - the one from the slow-mo Phantom sequence.
Is it the same problem?
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#12 Dory Aoun

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 02:11 PM

Posted Image

Look at the edges of the sand on the ground. There is some green/orangish edges. I noticed this in the theater as well.

Posted Image
Same thing on the top right, where the rust is being shooken off the car.

Posted Image

Same shot, more apparent. This was noticeable in the theater.

Posted Image

This shoot looked much cleaner, but a lot higher in terms of contrast. Could the contrast be hiding the aforementioned problems?


I am not Sure how you grabbed your stills
Here is the right images without any of the above comments ... and by the way the High Speed scenes were NOT shot by the PHANTOM camera!
Believe me ;)

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#13 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 02:33 PM

I am not Sure how you grabbed your stills
Here is the right images without any of the above comments ... and by the way the High Speed scenes were NOT shot by the PHANTOM camera!
Believe me ;)


What camera did you use?
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#14 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 09:55 AM

I thought the film was OK but nine oscar nominations?! To me it was a typical Hollywood story shot in a verité style that gave it a little edge but ofcourse is very trendy nowadays, maybe more in Europe than anywhere else. Personally I like that style a lot so I didn't have any problems with it. I especially admired some of the very dark scenes, but as far as story goes this film left a lot to be desired.
To me the film seemed to be in conflict with itself, trying to show the soldiers who serve in Iraq (and the Iraqi people as well) as ordinary people, but it somehow couldn't resist some of the heavy stereotyping you would expect in a typical blockbuster war movie. I think the last scene was exemplary, where the main character walks alone to the horizon like some kind of Lucky Luke cowboy, with heavy rock music in the score. Most of the scenes left me with a typical feeling that there was something missing, that it could have been a lot better if it weren't for all the bombast.
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#15 John Holland

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 12:13 PM

Another kick in the balls for Kodak , maybe they will understand someday before they go bust ! that we want colour neg to look like film and not Video/HD But think they have really lost the plot now and thats them down the plug hole !
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#16 Will Earl

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 01:13 PM

To me it was a typical Hollywood story shot in a verité style...


I thought the structure of the film was quite interesting and far from typical. Or am I the only one who thought that it was more a series of short vignettes rather than one all encompassing arc?
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#17 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 01:34 PM

I thought the structure of the film was quite interesting and far from typical. Or am I the only one who thought that it was more a series of short vignettes rather than one all encompassing arc?


I agree, for me the series of vignettes structure was very effective in creating the feeling of being a cog in a machine, only witnessing your part in the whole without ever understanding what's going on in a holistic sense. It felt more realistic than movies that tie the characters into 'the mission' that will end the war or whatever.

But more cinematographically relevant:

Dory Aoun, Mr 'high speed camera' on the hurt locker (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3056874/) are you really going to just tantalize us with vague nuggets of information or illuminate us with the truth?

What camera did you use if not the Phantom? Photosonics? something else?
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#18 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 11:25 AM

and by the way the High Speed scenes were NOT shot by the PHANTOM camera!
Believe me ;)



OK well that is what everyone thinks so... will the real camera please step out from behind door number two????

-Rob-
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#19 Antti Näyhä

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 05:43 PM

It seems Dory's giving us at least some clues. Strangely, both AC and Digital Cinema Report are talking at length about the Phantom HD...

I'm starting to think that they really used some top-secret experimental military gear and just came up with the Phantom as a cover story. :ph34r:
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#20 Andrew Sidwell

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 06:34 PM

Some more info here:-

http://iloubnan.info...eportage/id/779
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