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Quit my technicians job, advice on AC CV


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#1 Ollie Bartlett

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 02:21 PM

Hey there,

As the title suggests, I've just handed in my notice at my nice cushy job as a tech at the local rental house.

Im now currently bricking it (english for metaphorically soiling ones self) as i try to make the jump into ACing.

Could anyone and everyone please take a look at my resume, and offer me any advice on how i can make it snap, crackle and pop, and generally not look so bland.

Is there anything im missing, or that should be included as standard that i have missed?

Cheers everyone,

Ollie

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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 04:38 PM

I've found as far as AC work goes, you're very limited when it comes to the ability to sell oneself. Your "Objective" and "Relevant Skills" section is probably too elaborate. Some of the things you say, really, are things that only YOU are saying, which employers don't care too much about, unless you have references listed who can say the same.

I try to keep my resume as simple as possible. Firstly stating what equipment I'm familiar with, followed by a list of my credits and who I've worked with.

I'm trying to trim it down to make it easier to read and also need to rearrange the order of productions to make the more eyecatching productions appear early on in the list, but here's my general resume (my "AC" resume omits the DP & Reel portions only): http://hotjobs.yahoo...owerbankcineres
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 09:35 PM

Hey there,

As the title suggests, I've just handed in my notice at my nice cushy job as a tech at the local rental house.

Im now currently bricking it (english for metaphorically soiling ones self) as i try to make the jump into ACing.

Could anyone and everyone please take a look at my resume, and offer me any advice on how i can make it snap, crackle and pop, and generally not look so bland.

Is there anything im missing, or that should be included as standard that i have missed?

Cheers everyone,

Ollie


A CV won't get you work. The relationships you've made will. Call all the AC's, Operators, and DPs you've helped prep over the years and let them know that you're making the jump to freelance work. Assuming you've got a great personality and have been very helpful over the years, then maybe (hopefully) at least one of them will take you on for a project or two. Anybody can push carts around and get pieces of camera gear to assemble, but it's your attractiveness as someone who can do that well AND be someone who they can spend 14 hour days with that tends to matter more.

Otherwise, just jump in and start ACing on student projects and low-budgets as the opportunities arise.
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 12:58 AM

I've gotten lots of jobs that have requested a CV. They're more rare than the ones you get by word of mouth, but new clients or gigs that come in from out of town looking to connect with and hire experienced AC's do ask for them. So it's definitely worth it to have a quality one on hand.
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#5 Ollie Bartlett

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 03:59 AM

A CV won't get you work. The relationships you've made will. Call all the AC's, Operators, and DPs you've helped prep over the years and let them know that you're making the jump to freelance work. Assuming you've got a great personality and have been very helpful over the years, then maybe (hopefully) at least one of them will take you on for a project or two. Anybody can push carts around and get pieces of camera gear to assemble, but it's your attractiveness as someone who can do that well AND be someone who they can spend 14 hour days with that tends to matter more.

Otherwise, just jump in and start ACing on student projects and low-budgets as the opportunities arise.


Its the AC's, operators and DP's that ive helped that im emailing to begin with and attatching my CV. Im getting a few replies trickle in at the moment, but later today its time to email the companies who's kit ive prepped these last years, but never had a lot of direct dealing with.

Ill write back if i get any updates.

Cheers guys,

Ollie
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Willys Widgets

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Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Opal