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Taking a reading, and the difference between high&low key


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#1 Trevor Durst

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 05:06 AM

Hi all,

I know the differences between light meter readings (incident vs. spot), but I am confused about one thing.

When reading with the incident meter, do you always point the sphere towards the camera, or can you read each light individually and then decide on how much you want each light to be different to the key by, and set the stop that way?

I was also hoping somebody could clear up exposing for low and high-key lighting scenarios.

For low-key do you underexpose the key light, or how does it work to make it a low-key scene? Is a high-key scene overexposed, or just simply has many more lights?

Cheers,
Trev!
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 02:00 PM

Hi all,

I know the differences between light meter readings (incident vs. spot), but I am confused about one thing.

When reading with the incident meter, do you always point the sphere towards the camera, or can you read each light individually and then decide on how much you want each light to be different to the key by, and set the stop that way?

I was also hoping somebody could clear up exposing for low and high-key lighting scenarios.

For low-key do you underexpose the key light, or how does it work to make it a low-key scene? Is a high-key scene overexposed, or just simply has many more lights?

Cheers,
Trev!


You can read one light at a time by either using a flat disc on the meter instead of the sphere or just by shielding the dome from all but the one light you want to read. Generally, you still set the stop by a standard incident reading including all light save, perhaps, hot kickers that may sway the reading unfavorably.
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