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H.264 to filmout.


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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 09:34 PM

Hey Phil or any takers,

Anyone seen some H.264 at any res knocked over to 35mm for projection? What are your ideas about the results? What about 35mm neg knocked over to H.264 at any res?
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:56 AM

Well, you could say that HDCAM-SR uses a subset of h.264, so any movie that's used that, strictly speaking.

I suspect you're probably referring to other circumstances, though.

The issue with this is that there are a lot of different h.264 encoders and an effectively infinite choice of bandwidth and encoding options. On the one end we have HDCAM-SR and on the other end we have video cellphones, and there's obviously a chasm of difference between them.

In general more bitrate is better, but there comes a point where it's possible to do the job of encoding sufficiently badly, using too many mathematical shortcuts and approximations and skipping too many of the encoding options, that this doesn't really help anymore. A prime example of this is the Canon EOS-5D mkII, which encodes h.264 at between 38 and 40 megabits per second, but really doesn't produce very good output. A more careful encoder could certainly produce visually lossless 1080p HD at these rates but packing that encoder into a realtime, portable, battery-powered and affordable package is beyond current technology. Doing h.264 really seriously well can require tens of times the duration of the video to encode on very powerful desktop PCs, and obviously, the little LSI in the back of the 5D can't be expected to keep up with that.

So the answer, as so often, is "it depends". Any answer someone could give you about their experience wouldn't necessarily, or even often, apply to you. What sort of circumstances are you considering here?

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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:01 AM

The issue with this is that there are a lot of different h.264 encoders and an effectively infinite choice of bandwidth and encoding options. On the one end we have HDCAM-SR and on the other end we have video cellphones, and there's obviously a chasm of difference between them.


How true, the Wikipedia article on H.264 lists dozens of possible H.264 profiles.

http://en.wikipedia.....264/MPEG-4_AVC
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:28 AM

What sort of circumstances are you considering here?

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You already answered it. 5DMII. Thanks, fellas.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:53 AM

You already answered it. 5DMII. Thanks, fellas.


My review of the 5D as a movie camera is due on the site at www.reel-show.tv fairly soon - you might want to have a look at it. I'll post a link to it when I get one.

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The Slider

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Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

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