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How to study those before you


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#1 Joshua Powless

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:12 PM

So I wanted to start a discussion based on the idea of what to do in the downtown between projects. I feel that I understand the technical basics, but that doesn't mean I even close to where I would like to be as a camera/lighting man(DoP).

So in the down time, and there are no projects to work on and I have one of robert els-wits, roger deakins, or conrad hall films in my dvd player how can I study it and actually dissect it to learn and improve and keep growing.

Im sure that everyday I could do something to be a better camera man, I just need a little direction any direction? anyone?


Thanks for your time
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:25 PM

Look @ how the shots form in editing the scene, important to know what to shoot when, and then, perhaps pause on each shot and try to dissect where the light is coming from and what each light is doing.
Then, if you really wanna get ballsy, try to figure out what each light is.
Perhaps, for all of us in our down-time, we can play a guessing game based off of screen grabs (dunno if the admins would like this as it's copyright?) or just a basic overhead drawn lighting plot (LXfree is useful for this.)
And just read as much as you can on everything possible always. And watch films. Lots of them! And experiment. Get a stills camera, if you must, and just some china balls and work lamps and a willing friend, and play with how to light them, a room, etc. Perhaps post stills of that on here for us to all critique and give pointers on (along with an overhead)
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#3 Joshua Powless

Joshua Powless
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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:30 PM

Look @ how the shots form in editing the scene, important to know what to shoot when, and then, perhaps pause on each shot and try to dissect where the light is coming from and what each light is doing.
Then, if you really wanna get ballsy, try to figure out what each light is.
Perhaps, for all of us in our down-time, we can play a guessing game based off of screen grabs (dunno if the admins would like this as it's copyright?) or just a basic overhead drawn lighting plot (LXfree is useful for this.)
And just read as much as you can on everything possible always. And watch films. Lots of them! And experiment. Get a stills camera, if you must, and just some china balls and work lamps and a willing friend, and play with how to light them, a room, etc. Perhaps post stills of that on here for us to all critique and give pointers on (along with an overhead)




Thanks Adrian!

this sounds like a pretty good exercise, and I will do so.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:44 PM

Don't mention it. Happy I could help.
I actually recall in my freshman film class learning the ins and outs of basic lighting with the help of a MR Potatoes Head, some clamp lights and dryer sheets (the best smelling diffusion on the market!)
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Rig Wheels Passport

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

CineTape

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets