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Splicing 16mm


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#1 John Adolfi

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 08:39 PM

What are you using to splice 16mm these days. For splicing together reels for transfer? For adding a longer leader? For repairs? For editing and slicing...for those bold enough to dare?
Tape or Cement?
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 08:52 PM

What are you using to splice 16mm these days. For splicing together reels for transfer? For adding a longer leader? For repairs? For editing and slicing...for those bold enough to dare?
Tape or Cement?

depends on the situation. I am old fashioned enough to prefer Cement, but it will not work on ESTAR which is what is used fro the last 10 years or more for prints. For those I have to use my perforating tape splicer. I actually would rather cut the film with an old Kodak presstape splicer for adding leader and such, and then use the perforating unit to actually add the tape. The presstapes themselves have gone aftermarket, but I was never comfortable that they aligned.

For Negative that is to be printed, or scanned there are narrow cement splicers. Tape may be damaged by the wet gate process.

I understand that the Ultrasonic splicers are now more common in professional use.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 11:58 PM

I have asked my telecine ops and they agree that tape is the way to go for splicing negative I want to run through their (Spirit and Rank) machines _which is what I normally would use, but not the pre-perforated kind, and always on both sides.

Cement tends to come undone (in my experience and other's), but it definitely has its place in the post production chain, like wet gate processing.
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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 06:06 AM

♪ Acetate originals to be printed with cement, we have our own (slow binding) product of an organic film cement free from CFC and dioxane.

♫ Everything temporary under pressure sensitive tape with the aid of Rivas:
Posted Image

♪♫ Polyester film welded with Metric Ultrasonic equipment (fresh register plates since the ones delivered with the apparatus seem to come from a backyard workshop somewhere in Japan whose employees have a weakness for Sake).
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#5 John Adolfi

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 06:16 AM

I own a "hot" splicer. Give me a good tape splicer that perforates the tape instead of using a pre perforated splicing tape please.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 07:07 AM

♪ [. . .]

♪♫


Haha, I get it. . . music to your ears? :D


Speaking of splicing, I was watching one of the "Bourne" movies the other night, bemoaning the days when you had to pay money for every cut in a film.

Even with a multi-million dollar budget, this film probably would have had to reconsider its editing style had it not utilized the now-ubiquitous DI process.
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#7 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 08:07 AM

[quote name='Simon Wyss' date='Jul 19 2009, 03:06 AM' post='293900']
♪ Acetate originals to be printed with cement, we have our own (slow binding) product of an organic film cement free from CFC and dioxane.

hello Simon,

Can you provide some more info on the film cement you use, we still use the Kodak cement, but it is not dioxane free. We use the Hamman film cleaver.

I am now doing restoration transfers of old television programs of the 1960ies, still with cement splices. They are still OK. The tape splices of the 1970-1980 period are all dried out and need to be replaced one by one.
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#8 Glenn Brady

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 08:38 AM

When done properly, cement splices do not come apart. I prefer them because they're much neater than tape splices and nearly as quick.
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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:04 AM

Can you provide some more info on the film cement you use, we still use the Kodak cement, but it is not dioxane free. We use the Hamman film cleaver.

I am now doing restoration transfers of old television programs of the 1960ies, still with cement splices. They are still OK. The tape splices of the 1970-1980 period are all dried out and need to be replaced one by one.

Yes, tape simply spalls.

PARATAX contains 48 % acetic acid. Mr. Hammann tried it and found it workable although too slow for his taste. It is irritant to the nose but not toxic. It's good to air the place in intervals (and walk two steps anyway) when you do assembly. We sell it in portions of 10 ml and 250 ml. No intent of misuse of the forum !
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