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H16 Rx3


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#1 Ashley Wing

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 02:49 AM

Hello all,

I'm actually a beginner on the film front. I've used digital ever since I started making films six years ago but wanted to try my hand at the film process. I'm in possesion of a Bolex H16 Rx3. After doing some digging around I've stumbled upon a question I thought best asked here. Please excuse the simplicity of the question, this is all new to me.

I understand there are different types of light meters you can get to get the right exposure on the film, spot and incident. My question is, do I need a light meter for the Bolex Rx3, if so which light meter would be best? Are there any particular models/makes that you guys can recommend.

Cheers,
Ash
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#2 David Auner aac

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 03:26 AM

I understand there are different types of light meters you can get to get the right exposure on the film, spot and incident. My question is, do I need a light meter for the Bolex Rx3, if so which light meter would be best? Are there any particular models/makes that you guys can recommend.


Hi Ashley,

there was a light meter you could just slide into the accessory holder on the Bolex. But other than that you don't have to take the camera model into account when deciding on a light meter. I use a Minolta Flash Meter VI, but they are no longer sold by Minolta but Kenco. I like it a lot. But that's just my personal preference. I'd recommend looking at a couple meters of friends/colleagues and see which one suits you best. Most of the people I know use either Minoltas or Sekonics. And you also need to decide what type of meter you want. Mine is a combined spot and incident meter, which covers most application, IMO. Also do a search of the boards, you'll find plenty there!

Cheers, Dave
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#3 Robert Lewis

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 03:29 AM

Hi Ashley.

I have to say that I am not an expert, but yes you will need a meter. I am sorry that I am not able to advise you which type or make of meter is the best for you, but what I can say is that I have an REX4 fitted with a Kern Vario-Switar 18-86OE zoom lens. This was made especially for Bolex and so takes into account the refduced light which gets to the film caused by the prism. More importantly, it is through the lens metering and so no separate meter is required. So, with this lens (which has an excellent reputation) you have the combination of zoom with through the lens metering. I find it to be an excellent lens. Hope this is helpful to you.

Regards, BOB
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#4 Ashley Wing

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 06:37 AM

Thanks for the posts, both have been very helpful!

My last question is about placement of the meter. Many articles recommend to place the meter by the object or actor, but a thread on here suggests the camera lens is the preffered method. Is there a right and wrong to way to obtain the reading, it must have an effect on the accuracy?

Or is it dependant on the reading being spot or incident.

Thanks again,
Ash.
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#5 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 07:31 PM

Best generic method is a spotmeter pointed on a grey chart in the position of the actual object. Skin tone normally comes pretty close to the grey chart as well. Through the lens meters can be erratic since they use different methods and can react strange on stray light. You can always double check the spot measuring with a dome diffusor metering and be sure the metering is set for the right shutter angle of your Bolex. Good luck.
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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 09:21 PM

Ideally you want a meter with shutter angle and filter factor compensation (for the prism loss) - meters in this league are digital, or at least have digital interfaces and are often incident /reflective combo meters - likely more expensive than your camera ...

I'd just get a ratty ol' incident meter - get it checked for accuracy (as in use it and look at the result :lol:) then learn how to adjust for shutter angles and prism loss ... Then you'll have gone through the age old Bolex method/right of passage...
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