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#1 Matt Collins

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 10:22 PM

I have a question about lighting and 7219. I'm shooting a short on 16 and it primarily takes place in a small city apartment. The director wants the film to be very naturalistic (don't have many lights). There is natural light from windows and I want to play with the idea of silhouette characters against them. However I really don't want the shadows to go black I guess more of a semi-silhouette feel. I was thinking filling the shadow side in to about 2 stops under. I'm a bit concerned if this is too dark? I do overexpose my stocks by 1/3.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 11:02 PM

I have a question about lighting and 7219. I'm shooting a short on 16 and it primarily takes place in a small city apartment. The director wants the film to be very naturalistic (don't have many lights). There is natural light from windows and I want to play with the idea of silhouette characters against them. However I really don't want the shadows to go black I guess more of a semi-silhouette feel. I was thinking filling the shadow side in to about 2 stops under. I'm a bit concerned if this is too dark? I do overexpose my stocks by 1/3.


2-stops under for the shadow side is very conservative, that's fairly filled-in looking. 4-stops under is near black, 3-stops under is very dark but visible. I'd go for 2 1/2-stops maybe.

But it really depends on if there is a bright highlight to frame them against because 2-stops under without a bright background then starts to look murky dim because you don't have a highlight to contrast the dark against.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 11:20 PM

One can always be a little conservative and keep the negative in good shape so that there is a chance back from "too dark" should one have second thoughts in post (digital or film print). I know this happens to me sometimes. My colorist often recommends me to keep the low light areas safe and print down later as it is always better to do so than to try to brighten up the image (too much grain) especially on 500T 16 mm.
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