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Kodachrome II Specs


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#1 Bill Munns

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 06:12 PM

Anybody know for certain if Kodachrome II is short pitch (0.2994") or long pitch stock (0.3000"),

The ASC Manual doesn't list it, but describes reversal type stocks, intended for direct projection, as being long pitch, and K II was such.

Thanks.

Bill
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#2 Bill Munns

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 06:38 PM

Anybody know for certain if Kodachrome II is short pitch (0.2994") or long pitch stock (0.3000"),

The ASC Manual doesn't list it, but describes reversal type stocks, intended for direct projection, as being long pitch, and K II was such.

Thanks.

Bill


Added:

I found the more recent K-II stocks, like 7270 (K-40) and 7267 (K-25) are listed as short pitch (on a spec sheet from 2002), but I'm wondering about K-II 25 stock from the 60's
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 09:18 PM

Anybody know for certain if Kodachrome II is short pitch (0.2994") or long pitch stock (0.3000"),

After all these years, It is probably shrunk to short pitch or less.
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#4 Patrick Neary

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 11:50 AM

Hi-

It seems a pretty safe bet that it was long pitch.

I think the old ASC chart you are referencing (I've got the 3rd edition here) lists short pitch as "Camera original intended for release printing" which K_II was not.

Then long pitch as "Camera original reversal intended for direct projection" which K-II was.

It's funny that Kodak would change 16mm Kodachrome to short pitch before they discontinued it, maybe it simplified production, or they figured no-one was direct projecting 16mm anymore?

I've got a circa- early 80's Kodachrome 16mm box here but it doesn't list the pitch anywhere on the packaging the way modern stocks do.
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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 04:34 PM

It's funny that Kodak would change 16mm Kodachrome to short pitch before they discontinued it, maybe it simplified production, or they figured no-one was direct projecting 16mm anymore?


They also added edge numbers. But don't know if they eventually went to Key Code.

I once had to set up some NatGeo KII with single sytem optical sound for Xfer.
The footage had INK EDGE NUMBERS.
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#6 Patrick Neary

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 09:16 AM

Here you go, you can buy a roll and find out:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...id=p3286.c0.m14

Although as Charles pointed out, chances are it has shrunken by now to short pitch!

If you search around on this forum you'll see at least one reference from one of the lab guys who was pretty adamant that KII was long pitch. Other than a Kodak old-timer, they (the lab folks) are probably the only ones who would remember.
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 03:11 PM

Although as Charles pointed out, chances are it has shrunken by now to short pitch!

If you search around on this forum you'll see at least one reference from one of the lab guys who was pretty adamant that KII was long pitch. Other than a Kodak old-timer, they (the lab folks) are probably the only ones who would remember.


Old Kodak literature mentioned that KII had a different type of acetate base than the professional stocks which shrunk more.
It also mentions that KII is/was long pitch.

This PDF for K40 typeA states that K40 has short pitch. Which explains the edge numbers.

Note the two sizes it was availiable in.
The 1200 footer would be for the Auricon Super 1200. Kodachrome would have been the most suitable stock for optical tracks. Ektachrome would have been too grainy.

http://www.super8.nl/k40.pdf

A kodak eulogy for Kodachrome:
http://homepage.1000...sp?item=2388083
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#8 Bill Munns

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 04:04 PM

[quote name='Leo Anthony Vale' date='Jul 29 2009, 01:11 PM' post='295069']
Old Kodak literature mentioned that KII had a different type of acetate base than the professional stocks which shrunk more.
It also mentions that KII is/was long pitch.



Leo:

Thank you for the contribution. Any chance you could help me source the old literature so I can save it?

Thanks,

Bill
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#9 Evan Ferrario

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 10:58 AM

I recently got a roll of Kodachrome II movie film with an old revere windup camera I bought off ebay. I was wondering if there are still places that develop Kodachrome II, I looked on Dwaynes website but there was nothing specific to KII. The roll I have is KA 449 Type A 16mm. On the back it says Movie Light ASA 40 17 DIN. On the side it also reads Emulsion: B. If this is still able to be processed I will shoot something with this film.
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#10 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 08:35 PM

I recently got a roll of Kodachrome II movie film with an old revere windup camera I bought off ebay. I was wondering if there are still places that develop Kodachrome II,

That was the old K-12 process, the (still but just for a year) current process is K-14. I think that their is one lab that does a run once a year to process K-12 as a B&W negative, at a high price. If it is not shot, you are probably better off to keep it as a souvenir.
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