Jump to content


Photo

HDR digital camera (20 stops of latitude)


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Tim Sibley

Tim Sibley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • Other
  • Toronto

Posted 11 August 2009 - 02:39 PM

http://www.fxguide.com/article556.html

Anyone else heard of this camera in development? I've heard very good things about Spheron's previous HDR products, and this looks like it'll have some great things going for it - including no rolling shutter artifacts, up to 60fps in test models, and 20 f-stops of latitude.
Even if this camera doesn't shake out to be too impressive, I'm excited to know that this type of HDR technology is coming so fast, which may help to address a lot of the limitations of current digital cameras.
  • 0

#2 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 11 August 2009 - 04:14 PM

http://www.fxguide.com/article556.html

Anyone else heard of this camera in development? I've heard very good things about Spheron's previous HDR products, and this looks like it'll have some great things going for it - including no rolling shutter artifacts, up to 60fps in test models, and 20 f-stops of latitude.
Even if this camera doesn't shake out to be too impressive, I'm excited to know that this type of HDR technology is coming so fast, which may help to address a lot of the limitations of current digital cameras.


There is a downside to that much latitude, though. Think about lighting for it. To light something up to highlight level, it will have to be a thousand times brighter than your key level. Also, to get real blacks it will take massive amounts of flagging-off. I suppose that will cause people to use it like RAW files and it will look very, very flat until grading is done.
  • 0

#3 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 11 August 2009 - 04:45 PM

Thomson showed stills from a camera with about that dynamic range at HPA in January. There was a thread here about it, I'll try to find it again.

Edit: Here's what I found:

http://www.cinematog...h...c=36842&hl=

I bumped it up, too.

-- J.S.
  • 0

#4 Will Earl

Will Earl
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • Other
  • Wellington, NZ

Posted 11 August 2009 - 04:54 PM

I don't imagine lighting for HDR cinematography would be much different from regular old cinematography. I mean when I take HDR photographs, I very rarely tonemap the entire range of the image, instead I select a chunk of the entire range - that chunk typically ending up very similar to the range I would have gotten if I had taken just one exposure, the only difference perhaps that I've adjusted the brights and darks of the image to my liking and I'm able to push and pull the image with ease.

I'm interested to see what they come out with. It'll definitely be handy for VFX work.
  • 0

#5 Sasha Riu

Sasha Riu
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 46 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 August 2009 - 11:21 PM

There is a downside to that much latitude, though. Think about lighting for it. To light something up to highlight level, it will have to be a thousand times brighter than your key level. Also, to get real blacks it will take massive amounts of flagging-off. I suppose that will cause people to use it like RAW files and it will look very, very flat until grading is done.




No.

I am affraid this just means that we will finaly be able to shoot movies on the simple light condition as is, regardles of daylight or nightlight conditions, without too much need for artificial ways to accomplish a natural look....
  • 0

#6 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 18 August 2009 - 03:06 AM

We can do that now.... Give me 1 roll of 7219 (or 5219 if you wanna be generous! ;) )
I'd not mind 20+ of DR on a D-cinema camera, but of course the problem there as was brought up here, would be the need to do a lot of the "tweaking," in post. While I love a good color session, I can only imagine the calls from clients who don't understand the need for a good color grading session.
  • 0

#7 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11937 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 August 2009 - 05:51 AM

Even if all you do with it is put a curve in it to make the highlight rolloff look really nice, which is surely the point, it's useful.

Also handy for doing things like timelapse. Anyone know what the technology is? Multiple sensors, different sized photosites on the same sensor, some new sensor tech?

P
  • 0


Technodolly

Opal

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Opal

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio