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How do you get to be a loader.


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#1 Luc Allein

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 12:26 AM

The bunch of times I did to load, probably like 7-8 times on various projects (no features or anything) I wound up getting the gigs through Panavision when I worked there. The writers strike hit, I moved back east for a year. When I got back this Sept, it was super slow and most of my contacts had kind of dried up. Ive been getting on what I can and doing tons of freebees but I just cant seem to be able to break into a loader spot after 4 years of on and off camera pa/camera assisting.

Its made worse by the fact that film seems to be an ever dwindling medium (used to at least get jobs off craigslist, now its all red camera) and a lot of commercials nowadays make the 2nd ac load as well. They wont spring for an actual loader.

Its really, really frustrating. I just cant get a shot or a steady gig. I just need to get more familiar with the paperwork aspect, the acutal loading part is easy. Ive never exposed any film or held up production or that kind of thing, Im a decent loader for being somewhat of a rookie. Here the last thing I got to load on, my only loader gig this year and it was a one day freebee gig. (Yes, on a Micheal Bay commercial on one hour's notice and the first time loading in over a year. Plus I get there and Paul Cameron is the dp. No pressure, right?)


Anyway, does anyone have some kind of 'in' to a steady loading gig I could sneak onto. Or, may I be so bold as to offer my services to anyone on here that might need one? Id even work for free for the experience. If I mess anything up, which I PROMISE I will not, I will at least buy you a case of beer as some sort of repentance. Im completely unemployed right now anyway so Im dying to get on any kind of set.

Ive heard Hallmark Channel is a good way to get in, Ive tried like hell to get involved with them but I cant get in touch with anyone. (If anyone on here has any contacts, hit me up) I have a good resume and can provide references. I just cant get any work and the guys that used to call me once in a blue moon have completely stopped. Its heart breaking, to be honest. I dont know what to do anymore.
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#2 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 07:09 AM

Work is very slow for a lot of people right now, so don't think that it's necessarily you. For the most part, contacting actual production companies isn't the way to go. The vast majority of your work will come as a result of those ACs who know you. They'll either want you to work with them or they'll refer you if they hear about an opportunity for you.

Also, you should sincerely think about expanding your skillset which makes you more marketable. Not only do you need to know how to load and unload film along with being very quick and efficient with it and the paperwork, with the prevalence of digital, you should learn all you can about ACing/"Loading" with the various HD camera systems. At this point in your career, you'll be more valuable as a "Loader" when you know how to confidently do the downloading of digital info into computers for backups. Research the various HD cameras, like Panavision's and RED and ARRI's.

If you're willing and able to "chase" the work, it's helpful to keep track of where the work IS. So. Cal. isn't necessarily the hub of it all anymore as states and nations are currently fighting each other to see who can hand out the biggest tax incentives/Corporate Welfare which Production Companies/Studios are following for the best deal. To help you with that aspect, check in regularly with http://www.realfilmcareer.com and click on the "film incentives" link on the right side of the page as well as keeping track of other real industry news that impacts all of us.

Apart from that, the very best thing you can do is to just get out there and work on ANYTHING you can, even if it's a short student film for no money. The reasons for that are that A) you will get better at loading and the paperwork B ) the better you get at Loading, the more you'll have time to help out the other ACs on the job on set and C) the more projects you work on, the more people you meet and add to your network, which means more potential people who will call you.

If your "regular" crews who used to call you aren't anymore, you should try to find out why. It could be that they just aren't working either so there is nothing there for you. Or they saw you in action and they found someone who is better. Or maybe they just don't like working with you all day long. I'm not suggesting that any or all of those are the reasons (because I don't them or you), I'm merely suggesting that you investigate why you're not getting those calls anymore. Once you learn the real reason(s), you can work to "fix" any problems and hopefully then you'll have more work than you know what to do with.

Good luck! :)
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#3 Luc Allein

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 12:57 PM

Work is very slow for a lot of people right now, so don't think that it's necessarily you. For the most part, contacting actual production companies isn't the way to go. The vast majority of your work will come as a result of those ACs who know you. They'll either want you to work with them or they'll refer you if they hear about an opportunity for you.

Also, you should sincerely think about expanding your skillset which makes you more marketable. Not only do you need to know how to load and unload film along with being very quick and efficient with it and the paperwork, with the prevalence of digital, you should learn all you can about ACing/"Loading" with the various HD camera systems. At this point in your career, you'll be more valuable as a "Loader" when you know how to confidently do the downloading of digital info into computers for backups. Research the various HD cameras, like Panavision's and RED and ARRI's.

If you're willing and able to "chase" the work, it's helpful to keep track of where the work IS. So. Cal. isn't necessarily the hub of it all anymore as states and nations are currently fighting each other to see who can hand out the biggest tax incentives/Corporate Welfare which Production Companies/Studios are following for the best deal. To help you with that aspect, check in regularly with http://www.realfilmcareer.com and click on the "film incentives" link on the right side of the page as well as keeping track of other real industry news that impacts all of us.

Apart from that, the very best thing you can do is to just get out there and work on ANYTHING you can, even if it's a short student film for no money. The reasons for that are that A) you will get better at loading and the paperwork B ) the better you get at Loading, the more you'll have time to help out the other ACs on the job on set and C) the more projects you work on, the more people you meet and add to your network, which means more potential people who will call you.

If your "regular" crews who used to call you aren't anymore, you should try to find out why. It could be that they just aren't working either so there is nothing there for you. Or they saw you in action and they found someone who is better. Or maybe they just don't like working with you all day long. I'm not suggesting that any or all of those are the reasons (because I don't them or you), I'm merely suggesting that you investigate why you're not getting those calls anymore. Once you learn the real reason(s), you can work to "fix" any problems and hopefully then you'll have more work than you know what to do with.

Good luck! :)



Thanks man, I'll check out that link. I def would like to get more into the digital side of things, Im surely gonna have to learn that stuff...
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Aerial Filmworks

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Rig Wheels Passport

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Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS