Jump to content


Photo

Shellburst film???


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 14 August 2009 - 07:44 PM

OK, prizes go to whoever can provide a comprehensive history and uses of this:

118353.jpg
  • 0

#2 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 14 August 2009 - 08:07 PM

OK, prizes go to whoever can provide a comprehensive history and uses of this:

118353.jpg


Well what I can tell you is that Linagraph film was what Kodak used to call it's instrument recording films. Films adapted specially for recording images off CRT screens etc.

However the shellburst film is a bit weird as it appears to be a film for use in military equipment and Kodak described it as being "special characteristics for photgraphing objects against a bright sky".

From what I have been able to find out about it, it basically seems to be a military film for ariel photography of U.F.O's.

Hope that helps.

love

Freya
  • 0

#3 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 14 August 2009 - 08:15 PM

From what I have been able to find out about it, it basically seems to be a military film for ariel photography of U.F.O's.

Hope that helps.

love

Freya


Well then that explains why all my shots of UFOs photographed with regular film never turn out!
  • 0

#4 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2427 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 15 August 2009 - 11:52 AM

From what I can work out it's a fairly high contrast red-sensitive film for photographing against a blue sky, which would record clear. Either that, or one lightens the sky with a blue filter. The shellburst, being a bright flash with white smoke, records black. One then makes whatever measurement is required direct from the neg.
During my time at a weapons range we used colour reversal. But then in England, a blue sky was a bit of a luxury.
  • 0

#5 Rob Vogt

Rob Vogt
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 16 August 2009 - 12:20 PM

My guess would be "Shellburst" is pretty self explanatory. The military used this to record the aerial-burst characteristics of early ground to air missiles and air to air missiles.
  • 0

#6 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 17 August 2009 - 04:06 AM

My guess would be "Shellburst" is pretty self explanatory. The military used this to record the aerial-burst characteristics of early ground to air missiles and air to air missiles.

I had a look through my collection of film datasheets. The closest I could get was Kodak Linagraph Shellburst Film 2476 (Estar-AH Base). This had an ASA of 250. It was a panchromatic emulsion with extended red sensitivity. It had a hardened emulsion for processing up to 130 degrees F, 54.5 degrees C. Development times in D19 were 12 minutes at 20 degrees C to 3/4 minute at 40.5 degrees C. In D76 the times were 7 minutes at 20 degrees and 2 1/4 minutes at 35 degreees C. These times give a contrast of 0.9. The uses mentioned in the datasheet were: Cinetheodolite photography, Spark-chamber photography, Bubble-chamber photography and cinefluorography. It was described as medium speed, medium granulartiy and very high resolving power. The datsheet is dated 4/1975.
Brian
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

The Slider

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc