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reversal film 16mm KODAK EKTACHROME 100D


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#1 Damien Bhatti

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 06:22 AM

I have an idea for a piece i am working on that involves using reversal film. But I was wondering whether using the tobin time lapse motor for stop frame work on a film like this is a no no. Because reversal is so unforgiving and I am opening up the shutter of the bolex for a really long time. (I have to use a heavy nd to compensate.) Is it best to avoid using reversal in this way?

And if I am not working with sunlight, in a studio - will a heavy nd and an 85 be ok? Seems like a lot of filters!

My original idea was to animate 35mm slide stills. But the costs involved just outweighed the pros. I figured that I can use 16mm reversal instead.
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#2 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 07:13 AM

The Tobin does an excellent job on this. I'd love to have one myself...
It's very difficult to properly meter timelapse. But if you're shooting interior and have tungsten lamps that do most of your lighting that's actually an advantage. NDs do a good job also as the more motion blurred image really does help to get fluid motion. I'd use 100T Color Negative Film (Kodak No. 7212) and not reversal for latitude without filtering. Reversal colors might be too crushed.
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#3 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 07:42 AM

If you do use the 100d colour reversal in the studio under tungsten lights, use an 80 filter not an 85. You need to make the light bluer, not oranger. An 80 filter cuts 2 stops so 100 becomes 25 asa.
I have shot reversal with a tobin time lapse motor. If you do the calculations, and you know how to use a light meter, and you know your camera, it can work.
but if you need a positive image you might consider using neg and getting a print made. If you mess up the exposures, you can get a graded print made and redeam the project.
good luck,
richard
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#4 Damien Bhatti

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 10:39 AM

If you do use the 100d colour reversal in the studio under tungsten lights, use an 80 filter not an 85. You need to make the light bluer, not oranger. An 80 filter cuts 2 stops so 100 becomes 25 asa.
I have shot reversal with a tobin time lapse motor. If you do the calculations, and you know how to use a light meter, and you know your camera, it can work.
but if you need a positive image you might consider using neg and getting a print made. If you mess up the exposures, you can get a graded print made and redeam the project.
good luck,
richard

i think i might experiment with the reversal as I need a positive image on the film to play with. Thanks for the help(s) - D
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