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Moving from Exterior to Interior


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#1 Scott Lovejoy

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 01:56 PM

Hi all,

I did the 48 Hour Film Fest over the weekend (uploaded shortly) and came across a few shots that dealt with going from exterior to interior and vice versa. I'm wondering what the options are to get the best look (not have anything blown out or too far under exposed).

Facts:
-Camera was an Panasonic HMC150.
-The biggest shot was a handheld shot where the actor opened a sliding screen door, walked inside then walked towards the front bay window and both her and the camera looked at the front window.
-It was probably the hottest weekend Maine had all year, 85ish every day and maybe 2 clouds in the sky, so it was BRIGHT outside.

My thoughts:
-If I were doing this with more time and had it more thought out I'd consider pumping the inside of the house with light, bringing the outdoors exposure and the indoors exposure to a closer level. I would probably expose for the inside and let the outside go by maybe 2ish stops.
-I would also consider some Rosco Scrim on the bay windows (with more time)

So I guess my questions:
-Are my thoughts correct in how you would pull this sort of look off with a good amount of time/equipment?
-What's the best way to do this if things are time sensitive?

Thanks to anyone who can help.
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#2 Steve McBride

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 04:56 PM

You're correct. Lighting the interior to match the exterior is the way to go. Often times as you had to deal with, it's very bright outside and hard to get that much light inside. If you can probably fly a 8'x frame or something above the actors to knock down the exposure on them so that when they move inside it won't be as bad, but your background is still going to be blown out.

It's really just lighting the interior to match the exterior.
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#3 Matt Read

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 05:26 PM

The other thing you can do is to do an aperture pull. The thing that's really nice about this is that it doesn't require any extra equipment (except perhaps for a remote follow-focus). There's a really slick looking one in "Shaun of the Dead" at 8:09 when Shaun walks into the shop. It's the reverse of the shot you had difficulty with (this one goes from bright outside to darker inside), but the principle is the same. They do a really nice job of timing the pull, so that you barely see it. I've also seen less subtle examples in other things, like the TV show "The Shield." That show has a grittier aesthetic, and not hiding the pull fits into it. Depending on the look you're going for, that could work, too.
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 07:19 PM

I've never worked on a shot that went int. to ext. or vice versa that didn't have an aperture pull. Usually, the interior is lit to a much deeper stop than usual so it's not as large a pull. It can be pretty seamless if it's timed well. It can also mimic what your eyes do when changing environments. For example, if you let the outside go very bright for an instant and then pull, it can mimic that few seconds where you squint while your eyes adjust to the sun.
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