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stock for int/ext shoot


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#1 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 01:28 AM

I'm shooting in a few weeks a short with half interior and half exterior. i like 7217 200T for the interiors because it works pretty well with the amount of light i have available.

my question - would you go with 200T for exterior as well just to keep things simple and easy to match? or would you go with another stock for the exterior? i'll be losing a stop due to the color correction filter. obviously i don't know exactly what the sun will look like that day, but i could probably work the locations to get out of the direct sun. would you have a preference and/or know of a good int/ext one-two punch for stocks..?!

Edited by Jason Hinkle, 28 August 2009 - 01:30 AM.

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#2 Rob Vogt

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 02:20 AM

Personally I prefer Tungsten balanced film over daylight film anyway so I'd just say go with the 85 filter. One stop loss of light outdoors isn't going hurt. Most likely you'll still want ND filters so you can get a decent stop that won't be to dark in your viewfinder.
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 03:02 AM

7217 looks great for exterior work, it's the way to go :)
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 06:24 AM

An 85 cuts 2/3 of a Stop.. not one full Stop.

I love 7217 but I love 7212 even more. :wub: (sorry 17 :P )

I try to shoot 7212 (rated at 64) whenever possible. Just shot a bunch of interiors with it (of course we had Lamps)... I would shoot the Int on 7217 (or 12 if possible) and the Ext with 7212 as 7212 can render more detail for your Ext shots. 7212 is Kodak's sharpest emulsion.
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#5 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 06:59 PM

I like Kodak's 12-17 stocks a lot, too. The 01-05/07 combo is great as well. Shooting a road movie on them these next few weeks. I prefer using these last stocks with daylight only, but have gotten great results indoors with tungsten lights with corrective filtering if I have enough lights or shiny boards -or even without color comp filter if footage is to be telecined.
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#6 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 09:27 PM

thanks everybody. i think i'll go with the 17-12 combo, sounds like it's a proven winner!
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#7 David Rakoczy

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 09:48 PM

Rate them 2/3s of a stop slower if possible. That will tighten up the grain (if that is what you desire).
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