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Exterior/Interior Natural Light


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#1 Robert Capria

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 01:07 AM

I'm planning on shooting a film on Super 8.
I have a Nizo 6080 with a crystal sync modification.
I'll use only exterior locations and shooting during the
the day. The interiors wille be some abandoned building
locations where daylight comes in from open windows
with no glass.

Here are a few questions:

1. Should I modify the gate of my camera to make more wide format?

2. What is the best Super 8 or Pro8mm film stock to shoot on in daylight?

3. What film stock is the best to shooting in an interior with natural light?

I've read a fair bit about Super 8 but I'd like hear what anyone has to
say on the subject.

Thanks,

Robert
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#2 Wooda McNiven

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 08:32 AM

Robert,

I am no expert but I am a similar situation. Your questions are difficult to answer without knowing your objectives and resources.

1) Does your film truly require a wide format? Or are you just considering the idea? Personally, I think modifying the camera is risky. It sounds as if sync sound is more important to your project than wide format so why put your 6080 at risk? If you require wide format, you can achieve this in post but then you have to be very mindful of your framing composition while shooting. I would experiment with this option before physically modifying your 6080.

2) You do not state whether you want your film to be in color or black & white. There is no best film for daylight, other than perhaps using a lower speed film rather than a higher speed one. It's all a matter of personal taste. It is also a matter of financial resources. Reversal stocks will, in most instances, cost you less than negative. All I can recommend is that you experiment with several different types of stocks and find out which ones will work the best for you and your project.

3) Same as above, but low light situations will require a higher speed film. Available negative stocks offer higher speeds and have more exposure latitude than reversals. But if your project can be Black & White, then maybe Tri-X reversal can fill the bill. Again, experiment before you start principal photography.

FYI: I have a short film I want to shoot but it's all at night time in a back yard setting. I really want to shoot this with Tri-X because I love the look of that stock (when exposed properly... that is) I do have access to film lighting equipment but because of the limited exposure latitude of Tri-X, I am not ruling out using a negative stock. I plan on shooting several rolls of Tri-X and a negative stock (either 200 or 500) and then make an informed decision prior to principal photography.

Good luck with your project and if you report more info about it, I am certain you will get excellent suggestions from others on this forum.


I'm planning on shooting a film on Super 8.
I have a Nizo 6080 with a crystal sync modification.
I'll use only exterior locations and shooting during the
the day. The interiors wille be some abandoned building
locations where daylight comes in from open windows
with no glass.

Here are a few questions:

1. Should I modify the gate of my camera to make more wide format?

2. What is the best Super 8 or Pro8mm film stock to shoot on in daylight?

3. What film stock is the best to shooting in an interior with natural light?

I've read a fair bit about Super 8 but I'd like hear what anyone has to
say on the subject.

Thanks,

Robert


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#3 Robert Capria

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:09 AM

Robert,

I am no expert but I am a similar situation. Your questions are difficult to answer without knowing your objectives and resources.

1) Does your film truly require a wide format? Or are you just considering the idea? Personally, I think modifying the camera is risky. It sounds as if sync sound is more important to your project than wide format so why put your 6080 at risk? If you require wide format, you can achieve this in post but then you have to be very mindful of your framing composition while shooting. I would experiment with this option before physically modifying your 6080.

2) You do not state whether you want your film to be in color or black & white. There is no best film for daylight, other than perhaps using a lower speed film rather than a higher speed one. It's all a matter of personal taste. It is also a matter of financial resources. Reversal stocks will, in most instances, cost you less than negative. All I can recommend is that you experiment with several different types of stocks and find out which ones will work the best for you and your project.

3) Same as above, but low light situations will require a higher speed film. Available negative stocks offer higher speeds and have more exposure latitude than reversals. But if your project can be Black & White, then maybe Tri-X reversal can fill the bill. Again, experiment before you start principal photography.

FYI: I have a short film I want to shoot but it's all at night time in a back yard setting. I really want to shoot this with Tri-X because I love the look of that stock (when exposed properly... that is) I do have access to film lighting equipment but because of the limited exposure latitude of Tri-X, I am not ruling out using a negative stock. I plan on shooting several rolls of Tri-X and a negative stock (either 200 or 500) and then make an informed decision prior to principal photography.

Good luck with your project and if you report more info about it, I am certain you will get excellent suggestions from others on this forum.



Thanks for your advice. I would like to shoot color but if b/w will look better (more easily art directed and more uniform) than I would use that.
I have a roll of Tri-X, some 64T and Vision 200. Which is sharper 64T with a lot of daylight or the Vision 200 because it's a newer and faster
stock?

Thanks,

Robert
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#4 fabian gebbert

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 03:11 PM

Here are a few questions:

1. Should I modify the gate of my camera to make more wide format?


hey robert. i would recommend you to use the ultra wide lens 3 for the nizo 6080. you can also crop the picture afterwards to get "16:9".
i would not recommend modifying the camera. if youre not an exptert it is very likely to damage it. use the UWL :-)
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#5 Robert Capria

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 10:49 PM

hey robert. i would recommend you to use the ultra wide lens 3 for the nizo 6080. you can also crop the picture afterwards to get "16:9".
i would not recommend modifying the camera. if youre not an exptert it is very likely to damage it. use the UWL :-)


Thanks for the info. Seems like a good option so the camera can shoot 16:9 and 4:3 without permanent changes.

I know the ultrawide is about $200 from some German company and other places. I've heard that about DIY gate
widening or paying some place like DU-ALL a few hundred bucks to make the change more expertly. I've never shot with a wide angle
lens in Super 8. Is it good to avoid close up because of some distortion? I guess it might help make for a little less shakey shots with
hand held or on a stabilzer applying the same principle of 16mm cameras. I've looked into stabilizers for Super 8 but is seems like
it would be difficult shoot with your eye on the eyepiece and almost impossible with your face away -- unless your an expert marksman.

I know I was shifting topics in the above comments but I'm just curious about a bunch of things Super 8-wise.

Thanks,

Robert
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Metropolis Post

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks