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Using Light meter on animals?


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#1 Simona Analte

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 07:31 PM

Hi,

I'm planning to shoot my subject- which will be, Pigeons .
Most of which will be Close Ups, on super 8.

My question is, if I want to use a light meter, what is a good way achieve good exposure using light meter in this instance?

Thanks,

simona
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#2 Chris Millar

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Posted 10 September 2009 - 04:12 AM

Incident or spot meter ?

If incident - then, um, use it - (its completely independent of subject)

If a spot meter then take readings off an %18 grey card or yer mates cheek in the same lighting conditions as your pigeons - thats for the same exposure as the incident would give you. Reality is that you can really dial in whatever exposure you want once you understand how it works (a poor mans zone system of sorts).
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 10 September 2009 - 02:10 PM

Incident or spot meter ?

If incident - then, um, use it - (its completely independent of subject)

If a spot meter then take readings off an %18 grey card or yer mates cheek in the same lighting conditions as your pigeons - thats for the same exposure as the incident would give you. Reality is that you can really dial in whatever exposure you want once you understand how it works (a poor mans zone system of sorts).


Many pigeons have large areas of 18% grey on their bodies-ideal subjects for spot metering!
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 10 September 2009 - 02:30 PM

Simona, it does not matter if it is Penguins or Talent.. you have to learn to Light (for) your Talent and allow them to 'walk into it'... that is the unfortunate part of our Business. You won't always have a patient Talent or (animal :rolleyes: ) that will hit their marks and pose for (your) Lighting... many times you just have to Light air!... then bring the Talent in and roll.

..and that does not mean you (may) not get your BEST Images.. often you will !!! :D


FILM LIGHTING
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#5 Chris Millar

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 03:27 AM

Many pigeons have large areas of 18% grey on their bodies-ideal subjects for spot metering!


So ! you heard it here first - grey cards are now called 'pigeons'

How many other film terms are animal related ? I know in theatre we counted over 20 ...
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 08:52 AM

already taken ;)

Pigeon - This is a heavy round disc with a lighting stud, used to position a light on the floor, much lower than a stand will go. Basically, it is a Hi Hat for lights.

(http://homepage.news...glossary.html#p)
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 01:45 PM

already taken ;)

Pigeon - This is a heavy round disc with a lighting stud, used to position a light on the floor, much lower than a stand will go. Basically, it is a Hi Hat for lights.

(http://homepage.news...glossary.html#p)


How about a penguin? I really like penguins and I think they average out to 18% or so.
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#8 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 03:02 PM

Simona, it does not matter if it is Penguins or Talent.. you have to learn to Light (for) your Talent and allow them to 'walk into it'... that is the unfortunate part of our Business. You won't always have a patient Talent or (animal :rolleyes: ) that will hit their marks and pose for (your) Lighting... many times you just have to Light air!... then bring the Talent in and roll.

..and that does not mean you (may) not get your BEST Images.. often you will !!! :D


FILM LIGHTING




Sounds like having a bag of bread crumbs on set could help to get them in the right place at the right time.
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#9 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 03:05 PM

I could get down with calling it a penguin. Or perhaps a "gloam," as i've always wanted to use the word gloaming (or in this case part of it)
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#10 Simona Analte

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 08:29 PM

Thank you all for the great responses!!!

It definitely does not matter whether you light "your talent" or a pigeon...

I'm off to experimenting with the birrds :)
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#11 K Borowski

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 08:38 PM

It's a light meter, not a phaser. Use it on animals like you would on anything else! :P

Either incident directly in front of them pointed towards the camera lens, or put a grey card in front of them and take a reflected reading off of that.


If you aren't able to do either of these things, then you'll have to guess how many stops darker/lighter the animal's skin or hair is and go from there.

Just be careful to close down for black and open up for white, not the other way around.
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#12 Chris Millar

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 11:00 PM

I could get down with calling it a penguin. Or perhaps a "gloam," as i've always wanted to use the word gloaming (or in this case part of it)


hmmm, when golden hour is running out you could mention the gloaming - yes/no ?
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#13 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 September 2009 - 08:19 AM

I could mention it... but I kinda liked the idea of calling for a gloaming card ;) just to get odd looks from people 'round.
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#14 David Rakoczy

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Posted 12 September 2009 - 02:10 PM

Thank you all for the great responses!!!

It definitely does not matter whether you light "your talent" or a pigeon...

I'm off to experimenting with the birrds :)



Get the Book!... it can save you a tremendous amount of experimenting... and actually make (any) experimenting, worthwhile.
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