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Rain on Window


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#1 Brian Childs

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 12:28 PM

Im doing a scene where the main character is in the car & it is raining outside, rain drops rolling down the window & windshield. How can I get the reflection of the rain on the characters face?
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 12:31 PM

Shine a hard light through real rain, hitting the window; backlighting it. Something like a fresnel.
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#3 Brian Childs

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 05:39 PM

would you say a 1K or 650 .. im thinking 1K might b too bright?
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 07:03 PM

It all depends on whether it's day or night and how close or far you can get it form the car. It it was day, you may want to start at something like a 4K PAR HMI.. for night, something like a 1K would be a good starting point, depending, of course, on how close you can get it etc and balance with the other lights around. And remember, you can always make a bigger head "smaller" with scrims and by moving it away etc, but you can't as easily make a small head larger.
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#5 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 08:35 PM

would you say a 1K or 650 .. im thinking 1K might b too bright?

The further away the light source is from the windshield, the sharper the rain pattern will be on the subject. So go with as high wattage a source as you can get and put it as far away as you can - a 2K fresnel would be a good place to start. You can also remove the lens from a fresnel to make the shadows sharper - this is called "open eye" configuration. Also get the actor as close to the windshield as possible for a sharp shadow.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 08:38 PM

forgot to mention it also depends on what you're shooting on, how you're rating it, how you want it to read etc.
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