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2001 stunts?


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 10:41 PM

I recently saw 2001 again and every time I see this film, I marvel at how well it was done. One thing that particularly impressed me this time was the scenes`when Bowman entered though the emergency airlock when HAL locked him out of the Discovery, also his sequence where he disconnects HAL. BOTH of these "weightless" sequences were amazing. I also saw Apollo 13 again where I KNEW how they achieved the "weightless" and THOSE sequences held up next to the stull from Apollo 13 effect. My question is HOW did they do it in those scenes in 2001?
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 23 September 2009 - 10:46 AM

They suspended stunt-men from the ceiling of the studio, often in awkward positions to hide the wires.

From what I recall, there was a lot of shooting straight upwards with the wires hidden behind them.


The interiors of Discovery are the real stunt. They basically built a giant human "hamster-wheel" that had to be stopped and started and kept from burning down. From what I recall, it almost killed Gary Lockwood (astronaut who has the "encounter" with the pod, also Gary Mitchell in the 2nd Pilot of Star Trek). Apparently, someone didn't bolt down a chair properly on the set, resulting in said chair falling 40 feet downwards and nearly hitting him in the head. Would love to see those bloopers; too bad Kubrick probalby destroyed them.

The crew would also leave things like empty film cans and bolts and miscellaneous items up there inadvertently, with the same disasterous results.

This film, along with "Grand Prix" represent an era of filmmaking that is above and beyond BETTER than anything that can be achieved today. CGI and models just don't cut it compared to the real thing, and the insurance companies wouldn't cover building a giant wooden ferris wheel with 200,000 watts of light being shone into it or actors driving around in real race cars in the 21st century.

JSB, I'd recommend you pick up a copy of the book on the making of 2001, think it is from 1999 or 2000. I don't have the exact title handy, but it explains how they did a great deal of the SFX, and is where I get all of my anecdotal accounts from. Great book, highly recommended.
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#3 K Borowski

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Posted 23 September 2009 - 10:51 AM

I looked and there are actually two:

"The Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey"

and

"2001: Filming the Future" by Piers Byzony (sp?)

I have the latter. The former is probably pretty good as well.

Did you see it on AMC? I caught the late night showing a couple of nights ago. Wish I had that channel in HD. . .
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 01:24 AM

I looked and there are actually two:

"The Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey"

and

"2001: Filming the Future" by Piers Byzony (sp?)

I have the latter. The former is probably pretty good as well.

Did you see it on AMC? I caught the late night showing a couple of nights ago. Wish I had that channel in HD. . .


Even better TCM, shown in the proper aspect ratio, no commercials and commentary before and after. I have an HD big screen, (My digital projector when through 3 $300 dollar Xenon bulbs, which gets old real fast. I got tired shelling out that kinda cash every time I had to replace them so I have gone for a year watching a small screen. The Sony HDTV (A gift from my dad and mom) is beautiful, probably 5 feet wide with wonderful color. The only problem I have now is my old DSS doesn't have those flat USB ports so I can get the HD signal. I'm gonna have to change it out eventually, once a get a little spare cash. (which actually may be a while :D )

I have heard though, that they make adapters for them I just don't know if the adapter converts the signal to HD or I'd just be importing a SD signal though the HD port. I do love this thing though and spen way too many late nights watching movies since I got it.

I REALLY want to get those books as well. I do also agree that when practical effects are done right, as in the cas of 2001, they look far more real than even some of the best CGI, problem is the techniques are limited and expensive and as you mentioned sometimes pretty dangerous. I still belive that people in our industry over use CGI way too much and could benefit from the examples of films like 2001. TRULY stunning work!! :D
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#5 Mitch Gross

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 04:27 PM

You might think Hollywood wouldn't build sets like that again, yet Brian DePalma had just such a set built for Mission to Mars.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 04:32 PM

You might think Hollywood wouldn't build sets like that again, yet Brian DePalma had just such a set built for Mission to Mars.


I thought I was the only person that saw that movie ;-)

To which set do you refer, the craft or the mars surface sets? There were no spinning wheels built for that, though it's been a long time since I saw it. I do recall their having very good zero-G and artificial gravity effects.
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 11:37 PM

I saw that film as well. I'm a HUGH Gary Sinise fan! Actually, it was a terrific cast, Tim Robbins, Don Cheadle, Jerry O'Connell, Connie Nielsen are all actors I really respect. I loved the visuals of the film The M&M stand of DNA not withstanding :D but thought it could have been better written.
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